Latest Blog Posts

by Adrien Begrand

28 Sep 2015


The way the traditional Irish folk song “O’Sullivan’s March” fades in is a thing of delicate beauty. Minimalist piano notes and violin drones gradually enter the mix, an ambient overture befitting an experimental artist like Oren Ambarchi and not a traditional Celtic musician. A few plaintive notes on fiddle start, though, and Bostonian Jenna Moynihan slowly works her way into a heart-wrenching rendition of the classic track. It’s but one of many exquisite moments on her latest album Woven.

by Adrien Begrand

25 Sep 2015


After playing lead guitar in latter-day incarnations of the New York Dolls and Drivin’ N Cryin’, East Nashville singer-songwriter Aaron Lee Tasjan set off on his own, recorded in the same studio where Elliott Smith made his final album, and emerged with one hell of a record of his own. A boisterous blast of American roots rock, In the Blazes will be released 6 October (pre-order here) but in the meantime you can listen to the Stones-meets-Mellencamp jam “Made in America” below.

by Adrien Begrand

25 Sep 2015

Photo by
Riley Smith

An award winning folk musician in his home of Nova Scotia, David Myles releases his US debut album So Far today, a collection of his previous songs that have been re-recorded in stripped-down format in the tradition of 1950s folk, roots, and swing.

by Adrien Begrand

25 Sep 2015

Photo by
Invisible Hour

Seattle band He Whose Ox is Gored - a mouthful I know, but at least it’s memorable - are set to release their new album The Camel, the Lion, the Child 9 October on Bleeding Light Records. If you’ve got a hankering for the kind of sprawling, epic post-metal that rolls ominously like dark clouds over big sky country, this foursome proves they do it extraordinarily well on the new track “Zelatype”, which you can hear below. With keyboards offsetting the almost gothic arrangement, it creates a strong dynamic between light and shade, a textbook example of how contrast can accentuate extreme music beautifully.

by Adrien Begrand

25 Sep 2015


Dig into the second album by Last Good Tooth, and if you know you’re indie rock, you’ll hear an incredible similarity to the great Lambchop, not only in the use of horns but especially when it comes to the crooning of guitarist Penn Sultan. Only with this band, they take the music into the darker corners of Americana. Sure, there’s a sense of playfulness at times, but with the aching fiddle by Alex Spoto adding a strong, melancholic atmosphere.

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