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Monday, Jul 23, 2012
by PopMatters Staff
Patterson Hood returns with his third solo album in September and notably all of his fellow Drive-By Truckers will make appearances on the record.

Patterson Hood
Heat Lightning Rumbles in the Distance
(ATO)
Release date: 11 September


Patterson Hood returns with his third solo album in September and notably all of his fellow Drive-By Truckers make appearances on the record. Scott Danbom and Will Johnson from Centro-matic and Kelly Hogan are also on hand to collaborate with Hood. The songs from this record are drawn from a period in which Hood was penning a book on his life at 27. The book didn’t materialize, but the songs did and they seemed to be a more natural way of Hood expressing himself.


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Friday, Jul 20, 2012
Another new tunes playlist with notes for a sizzling summer soundtrack, including Passion Pit, Liars, and Teen Daze.

Summer is in full swing with plenty of new music heating things up for the next playlist. A single from the much-anticipated Passion Pit album starts things off with the venerable Hot Chip next in line. Newcomers Deep Sea Arcade, Teen Daze and Stepdad are definitely worth a listen, while more music from Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros, Pomegrantes are always welcome additions.


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Wednesday, Jul 18, 2012
Though the first offering from Green Day's forthcoming album trilogy is by no means the most stupendous lead single the trio has ever issued, it isn’t a dog either, and its stronger points hold up well compared to its shortcomings after repeated listens. Still, wasn't the public promised the return of a "fun" Green Day?

Monday saw the premiere of Green Day’s newest single, the public’s first taste of an audacious album trilogy that will see its first installment, ¡Uno!, hit stores in September. As a longtime fan (Dookie and Nimrod practically soundtracked my high school years), I’ve had mixed feelings regarding the trio’s more ambitious post-American Idiot undertakings (increasingly ponderous music videos, a second rock opera LP, an honest-to-God Broadway musical). It’s laudable that Billie Joe Armstrong, Mike Dirnt, and Tre Cool are so intent on broadening their stylistic palette and challenging themselves creatively so far into their career, but the manner they’ve gone about it has felt increasingly stuffy and po-faced with each new “We’re an Important Band now” gesture. Luckily, Armstrong was quoted by Rolling Stone last month as saying, “The last record got so serious. We wanted to make things more fun”, which was a much-welcomed comment to hear after years of plodding ballads like “21 Guns” and “Wake Me Up When September Ends”.


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Tuesday, Jul 17, 2012
Typically, when a band releases a video for their new single, they release a video for their new single. That video is often a series of spiffy, moving images that relate visually and/or thematically to the song that accompanies it, for the purpose of selling said song. Pepe Deluxé is not a typical band.

Continuing to defy logic and expectations like the noble sasquatch defies discovery, the Finnish psychedelic anomoly’s new offering for “Go Supersonic” isn’t so much a video for one of the best songs from their recent masterpiece Queen of the Wave as it is a mock advertisement for the Super Sonic Sound System, a wood panelled modular package presented by a go-go dancing marketing manager. It’s an “homage to the glorious age of Hi-Fi, when speakers were big and far apart, many people actually built their own systems and portable meant ‘with a forklift’”. As such, it has nothing to do with the album’s pop opera libretto, and the song is talked over and tweaked throughout the video, making it hard to actually hear the music the video was made for.


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Friday, Jul 13, 2012
by PopMatters Staff
Taking the spare approach of Dico's new single, "Moon to Let", and adding in layers of bubbling synths, Zero 7 adds a further warmth to the song with an electronic sheen.

Denmark’s Tina Dico possesses a deep, atmospheric voice suggesting the chilly outdoor landscapes of rural northern Europe mixed with the cozy interiors of rich colors and a fireplace. In other words, her voice is perfectly suited to music that is simultaneously cool, moody and warm. So, taking the spare approach of Dico’s new single, “Moon to Let”, and adding in layers of bubbling synths, Zero 7 adds a further warmth to the song with an electronic sheen.


The “Moon to Let” EP will release on 16 July (UK), 17 July (US) and features the original tune and remixes like this one and another by Fink. Dico’s new album, Where Do You Go to Disappear?, produced in Iceland with her musical partner Helgi Jonsson, will be available on 10 September via her own label, Finest Gramophone.



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