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Wednesday, Jun 30, 2010

After what seems like years of push-backs and delays, Sir Lucious Left Foot: The Son of Chico Dusty—the first stand-alone solo album from Outkast rapper Big Boi—is set to hit the record stores and legal-download sites on July 6.


But that doesn’t mean you have to wait until next week to hear the T.I., Gucci Mane and George Clinton-featuring album. You can spend your July 4th weekend listening to tracks like “Shutterbug” and “Shine Blockas” by making your way to Big Boi’s MySpace where Sir Lucious Left Foot is now streaming in its entirety.


On the other hand, the 15-track album contains over an hour of irresistibly futuristic-funk, so make sure you’ve got that laptop charged up and plenty of credits free on your data plan before you give in to the understandable urge to blast it through your car’s speakers.


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Wednesday, Jun 30, 2010
Lauryn Hill grants a brief interview to NPR.

To say Lauryn Hill kept a low profile in the previous decade is one of the biggest understatements in rock. As years have gone by since her iconic The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill, Hill’s mystique just grows larger. During a segment on NPR’s All Things Considered, reporter Zoe Chase discusses the impact of Hill’s 1998 classic as well as the weird rumors that have risen about the singer’s behavior (not allowing people to look her in the eye when they’re speaking with her?). However, this routine profile takes a huge left-field turn when Chase is invited to ride along with Lauryn Hill.


[Listen at NPR]


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Friday, Jun 25, 2010

As a tween, my middle-school’s playing field was located next to the local “Alternative School”. The oft-repeated joke amongst my ska-punk loving classmates was that rather than signifying that it was a special institution for kids expelled from the mainstream education system, the “Alternative” adjective meant that everyone who went there was “forced to listen to Bush all day long”.


Bush, the big-in-the-U.S.A. British rock band fronted by Gavin Rossdale, pretty much disappeared from the radio within the next couple of years, but at the time they were the epitome of the post-grunge “alternative” rock bands that—to my friends’ jaded 12-year-old minds at least—seemed to ape old-fashioned cock-rock more than it did Kurt Cobain. (I’ll always wonder what the old crew thought of Rossdale’s 2008 more-saccharine-than-“Glycerine” solo track “Love Remains the Same”?)


Well now Bush is back, reforming for their first shows in eight years and a new album, Everything Always Now. The first single, “Afterlife”, is currently streaming on their website (though it looks like you’ll have to make the potentially humiliating step of declaring your love for Bush on Facebook to listen to it). The sound is a little different, but mainly because this song seems to be influenced by current rock-radio mainstays like Nickelback and Lifehouse. All you “Greedy Fly” lovers out there feel free to check it out at the link below…


“Afterlife” [streaming]


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Wednesday, Jun 23, 2010

Clinic has announced that their sixth album, titled Bubblegum, will be released on Domino October 4 (UK) and October 5 (US). Domino has also provided a brief medley of the album.



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Tuesday, Jun 22, 2010

For almost five decades, Herbie Hancock has provided listeners with a wide variety of traditional and experimental jazz records. With 46 studio albums, 12 Grammy Awards (including the award for Best Album for 2008’s River: The Joni Letters) and one Oscar under his belt, there is very little the iconic pianist and composer has left to accomplish.


Therefore, it is always interesting to see what route Hancock plans on taking with each project. Since his 1962 debut, Takin’ Off, he has written and recorded everything from jazz standards to electronic and hip-hop based instrumentals.


For his newest record, The Imagine Project, Hancock decided to go a route similar to that of his last two albums. For 2005’s Possibilities, he recruited John Mayer, Carlos Santana, Paul Simon and Trey Anastasio, among others, to cover a range of popular R&B and rock hits. In 2008, he invited singers like Leonard Cohen, Tina Turner and Norah Jones to cover songs by singer-songwriter Joni Mitchell on River: The Joni Letters.


On 22 June, Hancock’s Imagine sees him collaborating with more contemporary artists, including John Legend, Pink and Dave Matthews. On the record’s opening track, a cover of John Lennon’s Imagine, Pink, India.Arie, Jeff Beck and Seal join Hancock for a jazzed up version of the 1971 tune. Matthews shows up later to help out on another Lennon-penned tune, 1966’s “Tomorrow Never Knows”, off the Beatles’ Revolver.


The album is currently streaming on NPR.


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