Latest Blog Posts

by Brice Ezell

4 Sep 2014

Following two stellar releases, 2009’s Isolation Songs and 2011’s Until Fear No Longer Defines Us, Finnish melodic doom outfit Ghost Brigade has just announced its fourth studio recording, IV: One With the Storm.

by Brice Ezell

3 Sep 2014

Paul Collins sounds like a guy who not only loves rock ‘n’ roll; he sounds like he’s spent his whole life living it. Feel the Noise, his latest studio effort, captures the spirit of a musician who has grown comfortably into his style. After years of playing in power pop groups like the Nerves and the Beat, Collins has continued to smartly integrate the distorted side of his rock ‘n’ roll with a keen ear for affable hooks.

by Brice Ezell

2 Sep 2014

Sam Llanas (formerly of the BoDeans) is set to drop his new solo record, The Whole Night Thru, this November.

by Jane Jansen Seymour

28 Aug 2014

Headset. Image via Shutterstock.

Here’s another collection of music culled from recent releases to help keep the summer vibe going. Check out new songs from indie veterans Spoon, Interpol, the New Pornographers and the Shins along with new bands such as Jungle and the Orwells. Vacationer, Parquet Courts and Ex Hex bring the party atmosphere while Christopher Owens, Stand of Oaks and Tweedy (Jeff Tweedy of Wilco) craft a mellow musical vein.

by Brice Ezell

28 Aug 2014

George Clinton (of the Parliament Funkadelic fame) once called violinist and songwriter Lili Haydn “the Jimi Hendrix of the violin”, a compliment that’s as accurate as it is superlative. Hadyn’s skill with the bow and strings can be seen all throughout her latest outing, Lililand, which comprises 12 tracks that highlight her top-notch violin playing, honest lyricism, and musical creativity. (There’s a particularly brooding cover of Led Zeppelin‘s “Kashmir”, which takes to the violin quite well). Below you can stream “Elephant Trapeze”, Lililand‘s opening number.

//Mixed media

Because Blood Is Drama: Considering Carnage in Video Games and Other Media

// Moving Pixels

"It's easy to dismiss blood and violence as salacious without considering why it is there, what its context is, and what it might communicate.

READ the article