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Friday, Apr 5, 2013

The black and white photos that fill the screen at the start of Neighboring Sounds (O som ao redor) call up a history at once personal and collective, possessing and possessed by the northeastern Brazilian city of Recife. A family stares into the camera, an old woman gives an interview, her face gaunt and poster straight, a group of workers stand with tools raised high, their sandals and hats indicating they toil in heat, perhaps in the fields that appear in some shots that follow, and likely not in the fine homes that loom in others.


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Friday, Feb 15, 2013
Danish and Blue, the sophomore album from Grails spin-off band Lilacs & Champagne, will be released via Mexican Summer on 4/23.

Portland duo Lilacs & Champagne, whose self-titled debut was one of 2012’s underrated gems, have announced an upcoming sophomore release entitled Danish & Blue, out on April 23 via Brooklyn label Mexican Summer. The trailer for the album, directed by band member Emil Amos, continues in the tradition of psychedelic spy movie paranoia that was dominant on Lilacs & Champagne, though there’s a tantalizing incorporation of piano that already shows a slight shift in sonic from that record. At only two minutes, the trailer is a definite tease, but the excellent control of mood that made the duo’s debut so memorable is still present.



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Friday, Feb 1, 2013
The Occupation means that decisions on the ground, when soldiers are "knocking on doors" of suspects and families, are left to boys who may have just left high school.

Dror Moreh’s Oscar-nominated documentary, opening 1 February in New York and LA, focuses on a particular period in Israel’s history, but it’s as topical and urgent a film as you’ll see this year. Astutely structured in part as a series of interviews with former members of Shin Bet intercut with images that can’t possibly mean only one thing, it considers how Israel’s decisions (official and not) following the Six Day War established attitudes, fears, and policies that shape tensions to this day. With a couple of reenactments set in a reimagined surveillance room—tapes recording, televisions monitoring, and computers whirring—the film suggests that advancing technologies and expanding violence didn’t make anyone safer, neither the occupying Israelis nor the occupied Palestinians. The conflict is fueled in part by access to oppressive machinery and weapons. Carmi Gillon (head of Shin Bet from 1994-1996) laments that—as in most every battle zone—decisions on the ground, when soldiers are “knocking on doors” of suspects and families, are left to boys who may have just left high school. Making these decisions “changes people’s character,” Shalom says, illustrated as he and other former heads remember their own childhoods, their fears, their faiths, and often, the influences of their fathers.


See PopMatters’ review.



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Tuesday, Jan 29, 2013

Though the past decade saw black metal enter into the mainstream, most media discussions of its roots and effects remain shallow. The present debate about a correlation between media violence and real-world violence provides a natural opportunity to examine this popular form. Having premiered at the just-wrapped 2013 Sundance Film Festival, Kat Candler’s short film Black Metal arrives right on time. In less than 10 minutes, the film provokes more serious thought on its subject than Until the Light Takes Us or other similarly uncritical/self-satisfied analyses of recent years.



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Monday, Jan 28, 2013
Scott Thurman's documentary charts the work of the Texas State Board of Education, as it insists that science classes in Texas teach intelligent design, given that evolution is just a "theory."

Don McLeroy is a believer. He believes in God, in the Bible, and in the need to ensure that all children come to believe what he does. In The Revisionaries, airing 28 January on PBS, he makes his case again and again, in the office where he works as a dentist, in the church where he serves as a pastor, before assorted cameras, and as a member of the Texas State Board of Education. Scott Thurman’s documentary charts the inspiration SBOE Chairman McLeroy provides for other board members, like Cynthia Dunbar (who served from 2007-2011), as they insist that science classes in Texas teach intelligent design, given that evolution is just a “theory.” The “power” here has to do with Texas’ influence on textbook selections around the nation: it has to do with numbers, as textbook publishers endeavor to serve (profit from) those schools ordering the most books. Well aware of this power, the Texas School Board creationists in the 1980s made a case for teaching the “strengths and weaknesses” of evolution: this language is challenged in 2008, and The Revisionaries follows the battle between McLeroy’s Republicans and a set of opponents, including Eugenie Scott of the National Center for Science Education and Steve Schafersman, of Texas Citizens for Science.


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