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by PopMatters Staff

19 Mar 2010

by John Lindstedt

19 Mar 2010

In the premiere of its 14th season, South Park decided to take the time to address the Tiger Woods scandal that happened during the hiatus. As usual, the show makes some refreshingly insightful commentary on the scandal, as well as the deeper seated issue of infidelity and “sex addiction”.

To sum up: most men in a position of power and wealth would have the desire to have affairs with as many women as possible. There is really no mystery why they would want to.

All in all, a really solid episode, especially since the show has been a little off and on in recent seasons. The South Park Studios site doesn’t have an embed option, so you’ll just have to watch it here.

Looking forward, the show will celebrate its 200th episode on April 14th, and for further reading I would suggest this recent New York Times interview with creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone.

by Jessy Krupa

16 Mar 2010

When music videos first really made their mark in the 1980s, broadcast channels devoted their Friday nights to them. As MTV and other cable channels gained dominance over the field in the 1990s, shows like Pop-Up Video and TRL pushed the networks out. While record labels threw big budgets at flashy videos, knowing that they served as both great publicity and entertainment, the cable channels realized they could profit more from cheap reality shows and “music based programming”.

Nowadays, the majority of music videos are watched on the internet, and their quality has mostly suffered as a result. In fact, some people say the music video is dead. But the music video is not dead. In 2007, OK Go became famous for their inventive treadmill routine in the “Here It Comes Again” video. Currently, Lady Gaga and Beyonce’s nine minute long “Telephone Line” is making a name for itself on the internet.

Nevertheless, aren’t music videos, as a valid art form, worthy of more than a tiny screen on a website or MP3 player? They should be viewed in a larger screen, on a medium that’s free and available to everyone, regardless of bandwidth. While we don’t have the power to add music videos to broadcast television, after all there are infomercials and sitcom reruns that need to be aired, someone is trying.

by John Lindstedt

12 Mar 2010

This week on The Sarah Silverman Program, two of the most subversive, non sequitur, absurdest comedians in entertainment joined forces to make some of the weirdest scenes ever recorded. Andy Samberg guest stars as Troy Bulletin-Board, Sarah’s imaginary childhood friend who comes back into her life after being “murdered” by her father when she was a child (if you watch the show, you wouldn’t bat an eye at that statement).

Andy and Sarah frolic through an epic fantasy land that includes hot air balloons, rainbows, hamburger hoses, and of course, the Loch Ness monster.

by Maureen Ryan / Chicago Tribune (MCT)

11 Mar 2010

Did you miss him? No? Neither did we. Well, whether we want him to be or not, former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich will be a familiar sight on TV again soon — as a contestant on NBC’s “Celebrity Apprentice” starting Sunday.

To kick off his latest self-promotional campaign, Blagojevich read the Top 10 list on “The Late Show With David Letterman” on Wednesday: “Questions Rod Blagojevich Asked Himself Before Appearing on ‘Celebrity Apprentice.’”

10. “Can I get paid in shampoo?”

9. “Would I rather stay unemployed than work for Trump?”

8. “Should I bring my attorney?”

7. “Do I have anything better to do?”

6. “Is there any chance NBC will replace me with Leno?”

5. “Can I get paid in conditioner?”

4. “Haven’t I been through enough?”

3. “How about my own show, ‘The Haircut Ref’?”

2. “How come I’m not a governor and Paterson is?”

1. “Will my hair get along with Trump’s hair?”

//Mixed media

Because Blood Is Drama: Considering Carnage in Video Games and Other Media

// Moving Pixels

"It's easy to dismiss blood and violence as salacious without considering why it is there, what its context is, and what it might communicate.

READ the article