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by Andy Edelstein - Newsday (MCT)

17 Nov 2009

Hokey smoke! Rocky and His Friends (later renamed The Bullwinkle Show) debuted 50 years ago this week. This wacky Jay Ward creation — featuring the misadventures of a flying squirrel and a dimwitted moose (as well as features like “Fractured Fairy Tales” and “Peabody’s Improbable History” aka “Sherman and Peabody”)—remains one of the most beloved of cartoons, even if it’s not being broadcast on TV today (a crime in and of itself).

Here are five things you may not have known about the moose, squirrel and their pals:

—During the early stages of preproduction, the show was going to be called Frostbite Falls Follies, to reflect Bullwinkle’s hometown of Frostbite Falls, Minn.

—The show’s narrator was William Conrad, best known as the rotund TV detective “Cannon”.

—Peter Noone, the lead singer of the British Invasion band Herman’s Hermits, got his name because bandmates thought he looked like Sherman of Mr. Peabody fame.

—Bad guy Boris Badenov’s name was a pun from Mussorgsky’s opera, Boris Godunov.

—June Foray, who voiced Rocky, also provided the voice for Boris’ nefarious better half, Natasha Fatale.

by Allison Taich

5 Nov 2009

On November 10th, 1969 beloved children’s television series Sesame Street premiered in the U.S. By 1970 a spin-off version of the show reached Canada, followed by New Zealand and Australia in 1971, the U.K. in the 1980s, China and Russia in the late 1990s, and the list goes on. Throughout it’s history, the show has featured some of pop culture greats, from Johnny Cash to Michelle Obama. Now, 40 years later, Sesame Street continues to entertain (and sometimes educate) generations new and old.



by Lana Cooper

28 Oct 2009

Underground filmmaking goes episodic! 664: Neighbor of the Beast is a guerrilla web series in its second season. Rife with unabashedly campy humor melded with a dab of the macabre, each webisode crams a surprising amount of character and plot development into its ten-minute (or less) installments. 

The brainchild of director/producer George O’Connor, 664 was conceived as a contest entry to create a television pilot.  O’Connor enlisted local, amateur filmmakers and pals, Gary Greenbaum and Alex Kaloostian, to help. Their entry didn’t win the contest, but the fleshed-out (albeit low-budget) concept of a suburbanite family that moves next door to a surprisingly congenial Satanic Majesty proved so popular, they decided to turn it into a web series. O’Connor’s wife, Tracy, along with fellow lead actors Arthur Laurie and Tony DeMauro pull double-duty as part of the show’s writing team, as well.  For an amateur production squad of just six people, 664 manages to be highly entertaining on a shoestring budget. 664: Neighbor of the Beast can be seen on YouTube or on the Lazy Horde Productions website.

by Eleanore Catolico

12 Oct 2009

Last Wednesday, Wyatt Cenac interviewed Dirty South rapper Slim Thug on the effects of the economy on his lifestyle. Wyatt plays the role of accountant as Slim Thug lists how his life has been shaken up, devastated by the loss of key members of his crew. Watch both the hellaciously funny interview and Slim Thug’s music video for “Still a Boss” below.


by Faye Rasmussen

5 Oct 2009

This week’s episode of Glee, “Vitamin D”, pits the boys against the girls in a glee-off. In the clip below, see the boys take on a mash-up performance of Bon Jovi’s “It’s My Life” and Usher’s “Confessions Pt. II” as part of their intra-squad competition. Tune into your local Fox channel on Wednesday at 9/8c to catch the rest of this week’s episode of Glee.

The first official soundtrack, Glee: The Music, Volume 1 hits stores on Tuesday, November 3rd. Singles from the first five episodes are available via iTunes.

//Mixed media

Because Blood Is Drama: Considering Carnage in Video Games and Other Media

// Moving Pixels

"It's easy to dismiss blood and violence as salacious without considering why it is there, what its context is, and what it might communicate.

READ the article