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by Imran Khan

29 Nov 2016


Backed by Books One, Maestro Gamin returns after a brief hiatus with a single from the upcoming Miracle Work Medicine EP. Decidedly more straightforward than his previous works, “Future Calling” mines a chunky, percussion-looped groove laced with the sample of a Middle Eastern buzok. Gamin’s designs are more socially-conscious on this latest effort, forgoing the surreal, cut-up lyricism that defined his earlier work. The tune never directly references the colour-line issues we are currently undergoing these days. Rather, there is the sly circling of racial matters that brings the rapper’s poetry into spiritual form. Gamin’s voice, quite like the soulfully smooth consistency of peanut butter, rips an edge rougher than usual here; his lyrics on this new material command rather than inform. In the past, the rapper has never cared much for dancefloor fodder. But on “Future Calling”, his urgency to connect language with movement demonstrates an uncommon parlance – one that has the power to transform the ghettoblaster into a talismanic device of medicinal properties.

by Imran Khan

11 Nov 2015


The muffled shuffle of Adian Coker’s “Been There” begins with a minimal line of percussion, soon eased into a more wholesome groove of metronomic hip-hop. This sampling of the South London rapper’s impressive talents features on his latest EP, Time Out of Mind, which has already gained some traction in his native UK. Having explored a gamut of pop-music styles, Coker’s hip-hop rests comfortably in a secured space of influences pooling from both sides of the Atlantic. There is indeed a good chunk of East Coast hip-hop in his work that is essentially the tether of which the grime, dubstep and electro-funk elements are attached.

by Imran Khan

11 Nov 2015


An amusingly cryptic narrative of Dadaist assemblage, Turkey’s hip-hop supergroup, 90BPM, presents the video clip for their second single from their premiere album, Kötülük Bizim Işimiz, a collection of alternative hip-hop that explores everything from Turkish funk to Prince Paul-styled turntablism.

by Imran Khan

20 Jul 2015


Photo: Simon Remark

Stripping away the exotic rhythms of her original version, Valery Gore’s latest remix, a very minimal electronic reworking of “July”, presents the song from a clipped, impersonal distance. In place of what had once been a relentless flush of Latin percussion are long stretches of gentle, airy sonics. Not especially a surprising turn since much of the number’s parent album, Idols in the Dark Heart, explored similar terrains of moody electronic-pop. If you want to get a sense of how radical the reinterpretation is, then you can refer to Gore’s original, presented here live at the Piston in Toronto; the shudders of polyrhythmic drumming and curls of brass are the flesh and bones of the original number to the remix’s ghost.

by Evan Sawdey

20 Feb 2015


The best part about “Go Out”, the lead single from Blur’s first full-length album in 12 years, is that a lot of people probably won’t like it.

Its side-stepping bassline and timid backbeat set the stage, but “Go Out” is, like all great Blur tracks, all about Damon Albarn’s stretched-out vocal phrasings interacting with Graham Coxon’s lyrical, expressive guitar work. The two collide and build upon each other to reach a climax that isn’t really that much of a climax, typical of the band’s mid- and late-period phases. Albarn finds an obtuse way to speak about isolation, dancing with himself, and then going out to the local (and sometimes, the lo-o-o-cal) on his ownsome, all while Coxon unleashes all the distortion he can out of his cheap pedal before trying to wrestle all of it to the ground in spectacular fashion, our ears caught up more in the struggle than the result. When you get down to it, this is a weird-ass little ditty, and therein lies its charm.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Here Comes the Bloom: Timothy Bloom Takes Hip-Hop to the Sock-Hop

// Sound Affects

"More sock-hop than hip-hop, soulster Timothy Bloom does a stunning '50s revamp on contemporary R&B.

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