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Friday, Aug 10, 2012
iamiamiwhoami's debut album has been quietly under the radar, but this daring electronic record has a beating heart at its core, and single "play" may very well be one of the best songs to be released all year ...

When we previously looked at the new material coming out of Jonna Lee’s iamamiwhoami project, we found that her synth side project had evolved from experimental film whodunnit into something much more succinct, poppy, and remarkably catchy. “Goods” was the final track off of Kin, iamamiwhoami’s first official album, and it was funky, emotive, and really, really fun. We called it “The Most Inexplicable Song of the Summer Candidate You’re Ever Gonna Hear”, and even now, that statement still stands.


Yet diving deeper into Kin reveals just how well constructed and multifaceted this project is. After several listens, the whole thing begins to feel like the best Bjork album that Bjork never made: sonically daring without sacrificing song structure or emotive impact. The songs are very good and the corresponding film for the disc (feature wild choreographed numbers with a bunch of mop/Wookie creatures) is a miniature epic in its own right; but at the end of the day, there is one other track that stands out strongly from the rest.


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Thursday, Aug 9, 2012
Recently, Insane Clown Posse has been collaborating with Jack White and questioning how, exactly, magnets work. Now they're returning to their dark, horrorcore days, and all we can muster is faint, barely-there yawn of acknowledgement.

Insane Clown Posse have been getting, strangely, popular again.


Although the face-painted duo have never truly gone away, their mainstream profile has been increasing year after year. Whether it be Saturday Night Live parodying their overstuffed infomercials for their annual Gathering of the Juggalos, their inexplicable collaboration with Jack White, or, perhaps, their lyrics about quasi-spirituality (including a claim that “there’s magic everywhere in this bitch”) being endlessly ridiculed, the duo have managed to work their way into the national conversation now and then, although often in a wildly negative light.


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Wednesday, Jul 18, 2012
Though the first offering from Green Day's forthcoming album trilogy is by no means the most stupendous lead single the trio has ever issued, it isn’t a dog either, and its stronger points hold up well compared to its shortcomings after repeated listens. Still, wasn't the public promised the return of a "fun" Green Day?

Monday saw the premiere of Green Day’s newest single, the public’s first taste of an audacious album trilogy that will see its first installment, ¡Uno!, hit stores in September. As a longtime fan (Dookie and Nimrod practically soundtracked my high school years), I’ve had mixed feelings regarding the trio’s more ambitious post-American Idiot undertakings (increasingly ponderous music videos, a second rock opera LP, an honest-to-God Broadway musical). It’s laudable that Billie Joe Armstrong, Mike Dirnt, and Tre Cool are so intent on broadening their stylistic palette and challenging themselves creatively so far into their career, but the manner they’ve gone about it has felt increasingly stuffy and po-faced with each new “We’re an Important Band now” gesture. Luckily, Armstrong was quoted by Rolling Stone last month as saying, “The last record got so serious. We wanted to make things more fun”, which was a much-welcomed comment to hear after years of plodding ballads like “21 Guns” and “Wake Me Up When September Ends”.


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