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by PopMatters Staff

14 Nov 2016


In his review of St. Lenox‘s new album, John Paul said, “St. Lenox represents that singular voice, at once very much of its time and utterly timeless in its thematic universality. Ten Hymns from My American Gothic is nothing short of a 21st century pop masterpiece.” St. Lenox (Andrew Choi) is a master of melody with an uncanny ease at crafting super catchy pop songs that never leave your head. His new single “You Don’t Call Me Anymore” exemplifies this as the jangle pop tune is utterly irresistible. For the video, Choi enlisted New York performance artist Matthew Silver who is well-known amongst the public spaces of the city. Silver injects humor into the proceedings in a way that’ll delight and make you smile in these scary and tumultuous times. Meanwhile, Choi’s music will lighten your day with its jangly upbeat tones and to-die-for hooks.

by George de Stefano

7 Nov 2016


If you watch TV, you’ve probably seen the ad: a series of quick shots of white folks of various types (chic young women; a straight couple in tennis duds with their dogs; a guy in a retro brown suit and bowtie) smiling and styling while a catchy, old school pop tune plays. The ad is for the Venetian Hotel’s new “Come as You Are” campaign; the tune is “Tintorella di Luna”, by the Italian singer, Mina.

by PopMatters Staff

4 Nov 2016


Andrew Paschal: I have to confess that I never made it as far as “Animals” when attempting to navigate the glitchy noise of last year’s Garden of Delete, intrigued though I was by its thematic exploration of adolescence and identity. I’m grateful to have the second chance to get to know this amazing track, however. “Animals” is downright pretty, and also tragic, with harpsichord-like keys elliptically framing the pitch-altered, futuristic eulogy of what I suppose should still be called vocals. This is one of the most emotionally direct and gratifying tracks I’ve heard from Oneohtrix Point Never, and I’m now considering giving this album a second chance now that I know it does indeed pay off to stick with its challenges. [9/10]

by PopMatters Staff

4 Nov 2016


Adriane Pontecorvo: Kid Cudi deals an intoxicating dose of psychedelic midnight sensuality and rolling beats on “Frequency”, a track that is all neon and silhouettes, just like its video. He murmurs and belts lyrics with equal rapture in the blissful throes of a sex-drugs-and-rock-and-roll kind of hedonism, going to places dark, exciting, and promising. It’s the kind of song that will catch you and pull you in further once you let it, a few minutes of total surrender. [8/10]

by PopMatters Staff

4 Nov 2016


Brice Ezell: There’s an oddity to the standard critical narrative of the Weeknd’s music following his major commercial breakthrough, 2015’s Beauty Behind the Madness. For years, critics invoked comparisons to Michael Jackson when discussing Abel Tesfaye’s voice. That comparison played a factor in the high praise bestowed upon the Weeknd’s Trilogy mixtapes, particularly the lauded House of Balloons (2011). Yet since Tesfaye hit it big last year thanks to mega-hit singles like “Can’t Feel My Face” and “The Hills”, there’s a growing perception that the Weeknd has “sold out” by candy-coating his nihilist R&B for a commercial audience. There are credible arguments to be made about whether or not Kiss Land (2013) or Beauty Behind the Madness are better or worse than the Trilogy mixtapes, but those arguments shouldn’t have anything to do with the Weeknd being “too pop”. After all, if you’re gonna compare Tesfaye to the King of Pop, you shouldn’t be surprised when he starts flirting with a pop audience.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

That Ribbon of Highway: Sharon Jones Re-shapes Woody Guthrie's Song

// Sound Affects

"Sharon Jones and Woodie Guthrie knew: great songs belong to everybody.

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