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by PopMatters Staff

1 Feb 2016


Photo: Nick Helderman

Chad Miller: Neat guitar driven background that repeats throughout the majority of the song. This brings a sort of anxious energy to the piece. Vocals and ornamentation from other instruments use it in different ways and accompany it with different notes so it doesn’t feel wholly monotonous. Vague lyrics like the repeated “Don’t tell” and the shape shifting repetitions make for a good introduction for Suun’s next album as it’ll leave you wanting more. [7/10]

by PopMatters Staff

1 Feb 2016


Photo: Sarah Cass

Chris Pittaway: This track is surprisingly tense and driving, given its flat, sneering delivery and not-particularly-varied instrumentation. Its retro-futuristic atmosphere and snarky political commentary demand multiple listens to reach their full effect, but when they do, it’s pretty darn chilling. [7/10]

by PopMatters Staff

29 Jan 2016


Chris Pittaway: Not bound down to any explicit era or genre (besides “indie rock”), “Voices In My Head” sees Bob Mould diving into deep soul-searching territory. Soundtracking his paranoia are fuzzed-out guitars that occasionally erupt into understated solos. Mould can “play the victim, or get on with life instead”, but his weary vocals make the turmoil that much more poignant for the time being. [7/10]

by Eric Risch

29 Jan 2016


With his band Glossary on hiatus, Tennessee’s Joey Kneiser released his third solo album in November 2015. Calling The Wildness “a love letter to rock and roll”, Kneiser’s influences show, ranging from Bruce Springsteen and the Band to Neil Young and Bob Dylan.

Stripping back Glossary’s soul-laden sound on the folkish “Heaving Only Wants Us Once We’re Dead”, Kneiser describes the song’s genesis: “First off, I’m not a very political person, but this song is more like a letter to my young biracial nephews – as boys who will grow up as a minority in America, I wanted to give them a song that belongs to them.”

by PopMatters Staff

28 Jan 2016


Dustin Ragucos: Somehow “Humanize” feels like an indie rock track that’s been translated into the hip-hop and R&B sphere. Maybe it’s the Bon Iver influence that rubbed off on Lizzo, considering that he’s contributing to her record. Track-wise? Pretty “meh” stuff that required its surprising last quarter to get listeners back into its world. [5/10]

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Beyoncé and When Music Writing Becomes Activism

// Sound Affects

"The overall response to Beyoncé's "Formation" has been startlingly positive, but mostly for reasons attached to political agendas. It's time to investigate this trend.

READ the article