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by Adriane Pontecorvo

2 Jun 2017


“I love the contrast between chaos and stillness,” says Nina Ferraro, the artist behind BONZIE, “and how those two things can exist in the same place.” Premiering today on PopMatters, BONZIE’s brand new video for track “Crescent” from sophomore LP Zone on Nine captivates as it studies that tremendous dichotomy.

Chicago-based songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Ferraro recorded “Crescent” in London with Ali Chant and Adrian Utley of Portishead. It makes for an audiovisual experience of fascinating extremes: glaring lights and total darkness, acoustic notes and electric edge, a lone woman and a vast array of machine parts. “I’m wearing only bodypaint in the ‘Crescent’ video,” notes Ferraro. “It took three people nine hours to suit me in paint!” Clad only in said paint, she aims unwavering stares that are as intense as her uncanny voice, which moves easily from calm and controlled to a wild high at the song’s climax. She is at once cerebral and raw, the stormy human experience embodied in song.

by PopMatters Staff

1 Jun 2017


Mike Schiller: There’s a title that looks like a total laugher (or, maybe, the title of a Philip K. Dick short story), but makes perfect sense when Matt Berninger sings it. Really, it’s a meditation on a relationship in transition, though exactly from what and to what isn’t clear; the only real clarity is in the difficulty of the situation. It’s one of those songs probably borne of a very specific situation or time in Berninger’s life, turned into the sort of sentiment that anyone who’s been in a relationship for longer than a month can identify with. The chaos going on around Berninger is appropriate for the subject matter, its looped and layered nature owing a debt to IDM while still grounding itself in the instruments of the rest of the band. It’s an interesting direction for the National, less mopey and more textured than much of their recent output while retaining the core elements that make them immediately identifiable. It’s a song that bodes well for the new album. [8/10]

by Jedd Beaudoin

1 Jun 2017


Freddie Nelson’s solo debut Shake the Cage will see the light of day on 7 July, and we are premiering the official video for the track “Hey Doll” today.

Based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Nelson teamed up with Mr. Big’s Paul Gilbert in 2010 for the United States record and Nelson contributed to Gilbert’s 2016 effort I Can Destroy. For his record, Nelson opted to make an album that shined the spotlight on his talents as a writer, arranger, producer and multi-instrumentalist. Relying on only one outside player, drummer Thomas Lang (Robert Fripp, Tina Turner), Nelson delivers a collection of songs that display incredible emotional range and depth.

by PopMatters Staff

26 May 2017


Adriane Pontecorvo: “Die 4 You” is a collection of contradictions. Airy, yet anchored. It flows, but it bounces. It’s the non-Newtonian fluid of indie pop, a liquid and a solid, and that unpredictability fascinates. Perfume Genius takes his cues here from trip-hop and quiet storm but never lets a single category hold the song hostage. It’s a sublime balancing act between the ethereal and the sensual, with a surreal video suitably vivid for one of the strongest tracks on album No Shape. Perfume Genius is an artist with incredible artistic depth, and “Die 4 You” shows a tantalizing slice of it. [8/10]

by PopMatters Staff

26 May 2017


Paul Carr: It’s evident from the blindingly obvious innuendo that Perry wants us to compare herself to a meal prepared by a Michelin-starred chef in a ridiculously over-priced restaurant where tap water costs at least a tenner. However, this is about as sensual and erotic as a prospective lover turning up at your house having prepared a meal out of everything they’ve found in the bin. Perry sounds genuinely unhinged like she doesn’t quite understand how deranged and unarousing it sounds to compare yourself to a buffet. Especially when you consider that a buffet usually consists of mostly stubby cocktail sausages and withering egg sandwiches. If that wasn’t bad enough, Migos contribute some demented, Auto-Tuned yelps that sound like the dying noises of an Amiga 500 as it is smashed up with a hammer. Seemingly desperate to impress,  they come across like a baby brother and his best friend desperately to impress his big sister’s mates. All in all, this is a meal that should be sent back to the chef. [3/10]

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