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by Eric Allen Been

16 Feb 2011


Two decades ago, dance music visionary Carl Craig helped marshal in the second wave of Detroit techno by launching the leftfield-leaning label Planet E. To commemorate the 20th anniversary of the imprint, Craig is set to release on 22 February a Planet E “best of” digital compilation entitled 20 F@#&ING Years - We Ain’t Dead. The 25-track project will include electronic music classics like Moodymann’s “Dem Young Sconies” and Innerzone Orchestra’s “Bug in the Bassbin”, along with next-generation mindbenders like Recloose’s “Can’t Take It [ft. Dwele]” and a previously unreleased remix by Craig of Kenny Larkin’s “You Are”.

And in conjunction with the digital release, Craig will be hosting on his website craigcarl.net a competition for fans to vote on tracks that should be pressed onto a limited edition Planet E vinyl box set. 

Finally, starting in March Planet E will also began releasing singles from its back catalogue, which will chosen and remixed by, among others, Ricardo Villalobos, Richie Hawtin, Kevin Saunderson and Mad Mike Banks. First up will be a Luciano remix of Recloose’s “Can’t Take It”.

The tracklisting for the compilation and the dates for Craig’s Planet E tour are listed below.

Scion A/V Presents: Carl Craig Interview from Scion A/V on Vimeo.

Latest tracks by carlcraignet

by William Carl Ferleman

15 Feb 2011


Forget about the cheery presence of Bananarama’s “Cruel Summer” in The Karate Kid. Is not this a goth song incognito? There is undoubtedly a distinct sense of isolation, alienation and melancholy in it, and the lyrics betray as much. But it’s mainly viewed as a happy, perfunctory, feel-good summertime song. For instance, one is easily tempted to hear “cool” instead of “cruel” in the song’s refrain. This track is begging for a certain band—Marilyn Manson—to cover it.  After all, Manson’s most peculiar cover of the Eurythmics’ “Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)” essentially put Manson on the radar.  Marilyn Manson has previously covered Soft Cell’s “Tainted Love” and, of course, Depeche Mode’s “Personal Jesus” with considerable success. Why not cover another esteemed 1980s song?

by Jessy Krupa

14 Feb 2011


CBS devoted three and a half hours to the Grammys, not counting the many commercial breaks. (In all fairness, most of the ads featured musicians or were from Target’s backstage at an award show-themed campaign.) However, only ten awards were presented on air in order to make room for more performances and meaningless celebrity presenters. 

The Big Winners:

Best Pop Performance By a Duo Or Group: Train “Hey Soul Sister”
Best Female Country Vocal: Miranda Lambert “The House That Built Me”
Rock Album: Muse The Resistance
Best Pop Vocal Album: Lady Gaga The Fame Monster
Best Country Album: Lady Antebellum Need You Now
Song of the Year: Lady Antebellum “Need You Now”
Best New Artist: Esperanza Spaulding
Best Rap Album: Eminem Recovery
Record of the Year: Lady Antebellum “Need You Now”
Album of the Year: Arcade Fire The Suburbs
Lifetime Achievement Honorees: Dolly Parton, Julie Andrews, Roy Haynes, Juilliard String Quartet, the Kingston Trio, Ramones, and George Beverly Shea

The Big Winners That Weren’t Shown on TV:

Best Alternative Music Album: The Black Keys Brothers
Best Dance Recording: Rihanna “Only Girl (In the World)”
Best Solo Rock Vocal Performance: Paul McCartney “Helter Skelter (Live)”
Best Country Song: Lady Antebellum “Need You Now”
Best Contemporary R&B Album: Usher Raymond Vs. Raymond
Best Female Pop Vocal: Lady Gaga “Bad Romance”
Best Male Pop Vocal: Bruno Mars “Just the Way You Are”

The Best Performances:

Some of the night’s performances were great and memorable, especially those which paid tribute to other artists.

by William Carl Ferleman

14 Feb 2011


Lady Gaga’s “incubation” bit was extraordinary, and her courage to be herself—creative and singular—must be respected; and she won three awards. At the same time, in terms of sheer substance, tonight her rendition of her new single “Born This Way” was, while intriguing, not relatively grand. In fact, it was problematic—several of the lyrics just were not sung by her live, and this was quite evident, as the song would go on while she turned her head from her microphone. It’s difficult to maintain both “off the wall” theatre and efficacious song renditions. It’s also difficult to beat her own performance last year—which included much more theatre—a bird nest, zombies, Gaga tossed into a burner, Elton John—alongside potent, substantive renditions. Instead, in my view, Kansas Citian Janelle Monáe stole the show, ironically, by using little to no overt drama: her “Cold War” bit exuded vocal strength, keen dance moves, and she did not require a quasi-uterus prop to achieve any credibility or success.

by Jimmy Callaway

11 Feb 2011


The religious controversy surrounding the 1979 film Monty Python’s Life of Brian upon its release is well documented and almost as notorious as the film itself. Many religious groups (please see Robert Hewison’s book, Monty Python: The Case Against, for a partial list) protested the film’s depiction of Jesus of Nazareth, and the film’s defenders were quick to point out that Jesus himself is never made light of, but it is instead his followers who bear the brunt of the famous British comedy troupe’s witty social commentary. And perhaps this is where the ire of those protestors was truly raised.

Jesus only appears in one scene in the film, listing the Beatitudes chronicled in the Book of Matthew. The camera pans almost immediately back to the outer reaches of the crowd, who are frustrated with their spot away from the action. The heated “Big Nose” exchange between Michael Palin and Eric Idle is funny enough on its own, but given the background soundtrack of a man of peace attempting to instill love for one’s fellow man in the hearts of those gathered, this petty bickering is raised to monumental satirical heights. Add to that the upper-class couple, portrayed by Terence Bayler and Python mainstay Carol Cleveland, and their gross misinterpretations of the Gospel, and we see how immediately the wisdom of the Sermon on the Mount could have been lost on those present. And then, of course, the whole thing degenerates into violence.

A fistfight at the Sermon on the Mount could be considered offensive on its own, one supposes. But really the most offensive aspect of this all seems to be how plausible it is. Especially to anyone with even a cursory knowledge of human nature.

Maybe we should just go to the stoning.

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