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by PopMatters Staff

6 Apr 2011

Austin’s Britrock-esque quartet Sounds Under Radio channels the anthemic melodicism of Coldplay and Muse on their latest single “Sing”. The song is so instantly memorable and catchy that it was just selected by American Idol for use in their latest promo spots. That means Sounds Under Radio is going to be getting some major league exposure really soon and will likely be playing those larger venues that their expansive sound is designed for. The band’s latest album is Where My Communist Heart Meets My Capitalist Mind, releasing 3 May, and is described by the group as “a record about people and the internal governing of the self”. Lofty stuff, but it’s good to aim high. The video for “Sing” was directed by Jeff Ray.

by Steve Horowitz

6 Apr 2011

Harry Nilsson allegedly wrote the song “One” after unsuccessfully trying to reach the object of his affection. The beep beep beep rhythms at the beginning of the song are meant to mimic the busy signal he heard on the telephone. “One” went on to become a big hit for Three Dog Night, but never was the song more effective than when movie director Paul Thomas Anderson used an Aimee Mann cover version of it over the credit sequence and as the trailer to Magnolia. The 1999 film concerns a day in the life of some seemingly random characters living in the San Fernando Valley. The people, played by such great performers as Phillip Seymour Hoffman, Jason Robards, John C. Reilly, William Macy, Julianne Moore, and Tom Cruise, weave in out of each other’s stories in a series of chance encounters. Mann annunciates every word in a clear and somewhat vulnerable voice.  She never falters, but always seems a little on the edge. Anderson plays it over shots of the characters who frequently can be seen speaking, yet cannot be heard. This simultaneously expresses their inability to communicate and their profound isolation. They and we are all “One” so to speak, separate but still together in our loneliness.

by PopMatters Staff

5 Apr 2011

The Tony-winning stage adaptation of the classic Green Day album, American Idiot is in its final weeks on the Broadway stage. You can still catch the show from April 5 - 24 with the Green Day frontman starring as St. Jimmy.

Pick up tickets for the remaining dates here.

About the show: The smash-hit, Tony Award®-winning American Idiot is Broadway’s most exciting new musical. The New York Times calls it, “thrilling and emotionally charged, as moving as anything on Broadway!” Based on Green Day’s Grammy® Award-winning multi-platinum album and featuring the smash hits “Boulevard of Broken Dreams”, “Holiday” and “21 Guns”, American Idiot is the story of three lifelong friends, forced to choose between their dreams and the safety of suburbia. Their search for meaning in a post 9-11 world leads them on the most exhilarating journey of the Broadway season.

by Matt Mazur

5 Apr 2011

When discussing female filmmakers, it is nearly impossible to not include Columbia University’s role in introducing new talent into the industry. The first woman to ever win a Best Director Oscar, Kathryn Bigelow for The Hurt Locker, is an alum, as are Lisa Cholodenko (The Kids are All Right), Nicole Holofcener (Please Give), Courtney Hunt (Frozen River), and Kimberly Pierce (Boys Don’t Cry).

This year, a new generation of women from Columbia will showcase their short films at the festival. Of note, and not to be missed, are Gina Atwater’s Crossing, Christina Choe’s I Am John Wayne, and Olivia Newman’s First Match. The subjects of these films eloquently range from a young female wrestler going to the mat for the first time, to an impoverished young man riding a horse through the streets to Coney Island, to a period piece about Southern racism.

by Evan Sawdey

5 Apr 2011

The title—Too Much Light Makes the Baby Go Blind—is kind of wacky.  The content, however, is downright unpredictable.

Greg Allen crafted “Neo-Futurism” after spending much time studying the Italian Futurists while at Oberlin College, eventually bringing Too Much Light to Chicago in December of 1988.  Since then, this show—wherein 30 plays are performed within one hour, the plays themselves changing on a weekly basis—has not only become the longest running show in Chicago, but has also spawned a branch out in New York as well.  Between his work with the Neos, Allen has also written and directed plays all around the country, often to great acclaim.

Here, in this exclusive interview with PopMatters, Allen sits down with us to discuss the Neo-Futurist aesthetic, responds to the charge that Too Much Light is “short attention span theatre”, and attempts to turn a table upside down with only the help of audience applause ...

//Mixed media

Supernatural: Season 12, Episode 2 - "Mamma Mia"

// Channel Surfing

"A can't-miss episode completes the start of the new season.

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