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by PopMatters Staff

22 Apr 2016


Emmanuel Elone: “Light Up the Sky” is a stunning electronic, R&B fusion. With some vibrant synth chords and some distinct percussion (that includes handclaps and possibly finger snaps), “Light Up the Sky” certainly isn’t lacking in the musical department. Bibio’s vocals are great as well, bringing some smooth, passionate singing to the table as well. For some reason, though, “Light Up the Sky” doesn’t pack the punch that I would expect it to, which is surprising since nothing seems to be out of place or outright bad on it. Still, it’s a good song at the very least, and might just simply have to grow on me a bit more before I can fully appreciate it. [6/10]

by PopMatters Staff

22 Apr 2016


Pryor Stroud: A bombastic, multi-episode indie rock opera based on the Grateful Dead’s project of the same name, “Terrapin Station” swells with novelistic ambition and fills its over-15-minute length with a variety of interlocking aesthetics, moods, and pop music templates. While it definitely necessitates a prolonged listening experience, it is deserving of the effort it requires, as the sense of narrative it generates—of following a character through multiple settings and situations—is hard to come by in contemporary rock. [7/10]

by PopMatters Staff

22 Apr 2016


Photo: Alicia J. Rose

Chris Ingalls: Bob Mould has been on a creative and commercial high point lately; his last few albums have combined crunchy guitars, introspective lyrics and smart melodies more effectively than anything since late Hüsker Dü. This time around, it ain’t broke and he ain’t fixing it. The guitars are still high in the mix and there’s minimal fussing involved. Mould continues to stay relevant well into his AARP years. The fact that he is constantly writing and staying true to his vision while sounding current and relevant is highly commendable… and rare. [8/10]

by Sarah Zupko

22 Apr 2016


Photo: Dwight Marshall

Back in March New Orleans roots rocker Anders Osborne released his latest album, Spacedust & Ocean Views. “These 12 songs speak about places dear to me, places I feel something profound about, but there’s also the presence of the universe,” explains Osborne. Indeed, the titles of the songs speak to the geographies explored on the album with titles like “Pontchartrain”, “Lafayette”, “Move Back to Mississippi”, and “Cape Cod”. Osborne has always been a wanderer and a restless musical soul. After all, he’s traveled relentlessly, finally settling in New Orleans in 1989 as his main base. Osborne is also quite the road warrior, touring nearly continually, soaking up the music, food and stories of the many places he visits.

by PopMatters Staff

21 Apr 2016


Pryor Stroud: Mixing insistent house percussion with Crystal Castles-esque dark-electro, Moiré‘s “Lines + Colours” is the soundtrack for a futuristic nightclub scene modeled around a new synthetic drug. Once taken, this drug manufactures startling illusions: the hyper-sensory stimuli of the post-midnight world - neon, shadow, reverberation, flesh-to-flesh contact—all seem to become different gravitational forces acting on your body, thereby simulating a sense of ecstatic weightlessness, of being adrift in your own skin. Through the lens of this drug, the Kraftwerkian synthesizer blips of “Lines + Colours” psychoactively morph into dueling lateral pressures—move this way, move that way—that engender the feeling of being in two places at once and, likewise, of not being confined to either. [8/10]

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