Latest Blog Posts

by Maria Schurr

3 Jun 2010


Here is the official video for “Time of the Assassins”, the second single to be released from Charlotte Gainsbourg’s rightfully lauded IRM. Whereas the video for first single “Heaven Can Wait” featured everyday scenes with a surreal twist and the appearance of a sort of known musician named Beck Hansen, “Time of the Assassins” has just a dab of the surreal and a lot of Gainsbourg in scenic locations. Not surprisingly, the result is quite cinematic.

by Sarah Zupko

2 Jun 2010


This Friday, writer/director Nicholas Stoller and producer Judd Apatow brings us Get Him to the Greek, a spin-off of the critically acclaimed comedy Forgetting Sarah Marshall (2008). Russell Brand again plays rock star Aldous Snow, who releases a disastrous song called “African Child” that basically torpedoes his career, until music exec Aaron Green (Jonah Hill) drags him from London to LA for a career-rebooting reunion show. Brand sings his own tunes in the film, rather like Jeff Bridges recently in Crazy Heart. Get Him to the Greek opens this Friday and this brought to mind other examples throughout film history of actors playing musicians for real and singing songs for themselves. These are some of my favorites… share yours in the comments section.

by PopMatters Staff

2 Jun 2010



Just as Born Ruffians offer up their new album, Say It, this week, the band plays an acoustic session for Grandcrew.com.

by Tom Fenwick

2 Jun 2010



The humble pixel, millions of which we see everyday and take for granted, finally gets it’s due in the form of a fascinating short documentary, by Australian animator and pixel artist, Simon Cottee.

Cottee film explores the pixel’s place in our culture, from it’s humble beginnings in videogames to the present day. Where collective nostalgia for the simplicity of things bygone, has found the pixel increasingly represented in contemporary mainstream art and animation. Going so far as to even spawn a musical sub-genre, in the form of the increasingly popular chiptune. 

Watch the documentary and check out Simon Cottee’s blog.

by Alistair Dickinson

2 Jun 2010



When PopMatters first posted M.I.A.‘s video for “Born Free”, we noted that the clip—which featured a group of unfortunate red-headed persons being rounded up and executed by some sort of totalitarian Gestapo—may have been a sign that the Sri-Lankan/British artist was joining YouTube sensation CopperCap in the ongoing (and extremely grave and important) “gingers” debate.

What we didn’t expect was that everyone’s favorite, carrot-topped, internet hero would take issue with “Born Free”, given that it seems to echo CopperCab’s central thesis that “gingers” are a “race” that faces the same kind of discrimination as other persecuted minority groups around the world.

Nevertheless, his ire has been raised once more, and in a video entitled “M.I.A. is Evil!! And I’m Not Dead!!” CopperCab goes hard at the “Paper Planes” singer, as well as at the “haters” who have been spreading false reports of his demise.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

It's Not Easy Being Yellow

// Moving Pixels

"In which we consider the challenges of and the reasons for making the “wrong” color choice in Pokemon Go.

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