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by Will Rivitz

9 Aug 2016


Crushed Out‘s “Skinny Dippin” is surf rock at its most primal. The lyrics—a plea for the “baby” to come skinny-dipping—are the most obvious part of this, but the music does its part too. Low toms thud like frazzled heartbeats, scuzzy guitars moan plaintively, and Frankie Sunswept’s twangy baritone glues everything together. We’re past the point of applications for “song of the summer,” but the burst of energy that is “Skinny Dippin” fills in the end-of-summer lull quite nicely.

by PopMatters Staff

8 Aug 2016


Photo: Donald Milne

Chris Ingalls: Hey, the Posies made a strong comeback album this year, why can’t Teenage Fanclub? It’s pretty much what you’d expect from these Scottish indie vets—timeless college rock with an irresistible AM radio sheen. This love letter to sophisticated ‘70s pop works so well that it sounds like Gerry Rafferty crashing a Bread recording session. Short, sweet, and chock full of lovely melodies and chiming guitar licks. I’m sold. [8/10]

by PopMatters Staff

8 Aug 2016


Johjn Bergstrom: How you gauge the success of this track depends on how satisfied you are with Beach House simply sounding like Beach House. To these ears, it’s not quite enough to overcome the fact the song says all it has to say by 1:33 while the running time is 4:03. [6/10]

by PopMatters Staff

8 Aug 2016


Pryor Stroud: The second single from Bastille’s forthcoming LP Wild World, “Fake It” is a crepuscular, R&B-shaded synthpop ballad forged from heavyhearted nostalgia and gilded in flickering neon. Like the best Bastille tracks, lead singer Dan Smith’s vocal is planted centerstage and, as always, it’s a dazzling spectacle to behold: operatic, laden with heartache, capable of both anthemic bombast and nuanced impressionism, it’s a voice that seems to reduce everything around it to mere ornamentation—a curse, sometimes, but for “Fake It”, a blessing. “Oh my lover, my lover, my love / We can never go back,” he sings, a reverberating cry of desire expanding behind him, and as he holds the syllable of “love” on the edge of his tongue, it’s easy to envision him taking his lover’s hand, asking her to forget the city where they once shared happiness. Perhaps this was the city first imagined in the band’s 2013 breakout single “Pompeii”, a place of thriving souls now petrified in ash. [8/10]

by PopMatters Staff

5 Aug 2016


Chris Ingalls: One of three new songs from Massive Attack’s Fantom app, “Come Near Me” is a really creepy number, with guest Ghostpoet channeling some dark combination of Nick Cave and Leonard Cohen, maintaining a low end while still keeping the sonics bright and fresh. The video’s middle section, with a knowing wink at Massive Attack’s previous smash hit, is a fun, lighthearted break in the tension. A fruitful collaboration that shows Massive Attack still making interesting music a couple of decades into their career. [7/10]

//Mixed media
//Blogs

The Specter of Multiplayer Hangs Over 'Door Kickers'

// Moving Pixels

"Door Kickers is not a multiplayer game, but for a while there, I couldn’t tell the difference.

READ the article