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by Jonathan Frahm

5 Oct 2017


Photo: Aaron Farrington

Ahead of an album release, Virginia-based Americana band Chamomile & Whiskey are sharing their latest single, “Nelson County”. The tune, steeped in equal parts bluegrass and Irish folk influences, is an energetic ode to the place that they call home.

by PopMatters Staff

4 Oct 2017


Tristan Kneschke: This destructo cut-and-paste track could only arrive in a post-Skrillex world. Then again, producer Travis Stewart’s humble hip-hop roots have always employed some sort of slicing technique (see “Big Beauty Hose”), so while he’s aligned his sound closer to modern trends, no one can accuse him of jumping on the bandwagon. But trickiness does not necessarily a good song make, and Roses Gabor turns from guest vocalist to sample fodder and becomes obliterated in the process. The manifold intricacies make for engaging, but not necessarily repeated, listening. [7/10]

by PopMatters Staff

4 Oct 2017


Adriane Pontecorvo: Wild, wild nihilism with a rush of pulsing synths and incredibly catchy dance beats. Lyrically, it’s a song that has given up on the future (“Living like there’s no tomorrow / We are here in the future past”), but melodically, it feels more like it’s simply shed its temporal and physical constraints, and is rocketing into the stars, ready to fly forever. Goldfrapp expertly balances crisp sound quality and computer-softened vocals for a dreamy club feel and that makes the wasteland seem like a happening place to be. [9/10]

by Jonathan Frahm

4 Oct 2017


Photo: Toshi Senda

“The old science fiction/future fantasy films are not far-off from what we see today,” says art pop performer Rié.

The Japanese-born, London-centered artist’s new EP, Levels, is releasing on 13 November. In anticipation of the record’s release, she is showcasing its first single, “Secrets”, in the form of a music video.

by PopMatters Staff

2 Oct 2017


Steve Horowitz: Just in time for Halloween, a truly spooky track. That Helen is some scary lady. The songs’ sonics do a good job of creating a creepy atmosphere that increases in intensity as the story goes from beginning to middle to end without a break. Torres’ vocals warble enough to mimic madness without being over the top—or at least too far over the top! She dastardly stalks the listener without stealth. You know she’s singing directly to you even though she doesn’t know who you are. [8/10]

//Mixed media
//Blogs

NYFF 2017: 'Mudbound'

// Notes from the Road

"Dee Rees’ churning and melodramatic epic follows two families in 1940s Mississippi, one black and one white, and the wars they fight abroad and at home.

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