Latest Blog Posts

by PopMatters Staff

28 Jul 2016


Chris Ingalls: An excellent collaborative effort that seems completely natural. Producer the Bug teams up with grime MC D Double E and it’s a deft pairing. Everything clicks. The Bug’s stuttering beats and blips are a perfect foil for D Double E’s rapid-fire rhymes, creating a contemporary urgency. The arrangement is dense and stuffed with interesting sonic choices - there’s something new to discover on each listen. [8/10]

by Will Rivitz

28 Jul 2016


decker.’s rock draws from blues, garage-rock revival, and psychedelic—all genres stemming from a dusty, down-home electricity. “The Holy Ghost” stomps in double time, driving 12-bar blues marrying frenetic guitar in an explosion of weariness. decker.’s harried twang holds down center stage, wildly gesticulating in a way that mirrors the live-wire guitar solo midway through. It’s stressful in the most enticing way, driving full speed towards a wall and living off the thrill of being so close to the edge.

by Will Rivitz

28 Jul 2016


If you’ve ever complained about people tagging music which ends up being too straightforward for your taste “psychedelic rock”, the Dan Ryan might be something you’d like. “Tomorrow Forever” is all whimsy and LSD-fueled glee, trance-like drums falling into line behind off-kilter synths and inseparable waves of guitar. There’s more than a little Beatles influence, inspiration taken from Harrison’s journeys in Asia and the sonic collages on the group’s later albums, but that influence is used in novel ways. It’s exceedingly trippy, not in the “man, this light show is so trippy, man” sense, but truly in the scatterbrained, wildly colorful acid sense. Things are all over the place, and that’s just fine.

by PopMatters Staff

27 Jul 2016


Chris Ingalls: Moving forward with Edith Frances replacing vocalist Alice Glass, Crystal Castles keep up with what they’ve been known for: loud, in-your-face sheets of electronic sounds and pounding beats. “Concrete”, from their upcoming fourth album, is a heavy, brash, slab of danceable doom-and-gloom. While they appear to be a forward-looking band, there are definitely nods to the past and “Concrete” seems to conjure up an unholy alliance of Ministry and the Cure. [7/10]

by Will Rivitz

27 Jul 2016


There’s a stanza in Billy Joel’s iconic “Piano Man” which applies pretty appropriately to Big Top Heartbreak: “And the piano it sounds like a carnival / And the microphone smells like a beer / And they sit at the bar and put bread in my jar / And say, ‘Man, what are you doing here?’” Because “My Breath Killed the Roses” is a deeply melancholy affair, a deceptively misanthropic ode set to gorgeous piano and gloriously imperfect violin. Its uninhibited sadness mingles with unbreakable optimism, pinned up by Scott Lavene’s cracked baritone. “It’s all about love,” sings Lavene, and in a twisted way — as with Joel’s masterpiece — the tragedy chronicled herein ends up driving unambiguously towards that love.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

I Don't Get 'Pokémon Go'

// Moving Pixels

"I’ve never felt more out of touch.

READ the article