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Thursday, Apr 23, 2015
The UK's own Palma Violets have a new video in lead-up to their forthcoming LP, Danger in the Club: the dingy rock 'n' roll of "English Tongue".




Danger in the Club is out on 5 May via Rough Trade.


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Thursday, Apr 23, 2015
The Australian indie rock quintet Running Young take their music to an abandoned mill for their video to "Did You See".

“Did You See” is a deceptive little number. It kicks off with a firm drumbeat that leads the ear to expect some high-tempo riff to come in and accompany it—but then, the rest of the band enters in quietly. By the end of the tune, the harmonized vocals of the Melbourne-based Running Young complete the mood established by the drums, elevating the tune to anthemic heights. Although identifiably indie rock—whatever that genre might mean nowadays, anyway—Running Young have a clear ability to do interesting things with familiar song structures.


The group’s latest release is the We Are the Sons EP. Frontman Joel Famularo brought Running Young together after miraculously surviving open-heart surgery at the age of 25. “I should have died before I even got to hospital”, he says, “because my aorta basically just popped like a balloon”. His joy in being alive and his passion for the music he writes is more than evident in “Did You See”. Give it a watch below.


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Thursday, Apr 23, 2015
Watch Aussie singer/songwriter Cody Simpson perform "New Problems" and talk about his role in the United Nations' Happiness Project.




Simpson’s new independent album, Free, is out on 23 June.


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Wednesday, Apr 22, 2015
The charming indie pop/folk of Ruby the RabbitFoot meets the intimate environs of Sofar Sounds' Dallas venue with this performance of "Misery".

Last autumn, PopMatters premiered a video by Ruby the RabbitFoot, a project helmed by singer/songwriter Ruby Kendrick, entitled “Misery”. Now, in a stripped-down arrangement of that tune, Ruby the RabbitFoot take to the stage of Sofar Sounds, a gig collective that houses intimate shows around the world. For this performance, the band took to the stage at Sofar Dallas. With only a clean-toned electric guitar and two voices to fill the venue, Ruby the RabbitFoot give a tender performance that highlights the intimacy of the space.


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Wednesday, Apr 22, 2015
Horses galloping through city streets and a slew of vivid costume changes enhance Chicago songstress Emily Kempf's anachronistic, avant-garde baroque dream pop ditty "Dynamite".

When a song is anachronistic, it’s best to make its visual accompaniment equally difficult to pigeonhole to a particular era. That’s the approach with the video for Emily Kempf’s “Dynamite”, for the tune itself doesn’t sound as though it is either historic- or futuristic-leaning, but rather like it’s emanating from a parallel timeline altogether.

“Dynamite” is an avant-garde baroque dream pop number with a dash of gypsy elements; its nebulous music has a Tim Buckley-meets-Björk flavor. Kempf’s haunting bellow is the star amid minor piano chords, hammered on and resonating as though played in a dusty mausoleum. As digital effects twinkle in the background, the song abruptly transitions to a comparatively upbeat, galloping keyboard melody.


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