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by PopMatters Staff

24 Aug 2016


Photo: Andrew Stasser

Chris Ingalls: The latest project from New York-based electronic artist Joe Williams, Motion Graphics is a purely synthetic stab at experimental synthpop, with an emphasis on “experimental”. With “Anyware”, he basically throws everything at the wall to see what sticks, and the result is a sonic collage packed with unique textures that sounds like Peter Gabriel’s Security album after a wild animal was let loose on the mixing desk. Interesting, restless and far-reaching. [8/10]

by PopMatters Staff

24 Aug 2016


Adriane Pontecorvo: Beautiful, soulful, and just a little otherworldly. There’s a tight simplicity at the core of both this song and its video: a voice, a woman, an empty room, piano notes spiraling upward. Within such clean lines, it’s that much more rewarding to go outside the box, glitching and syncopating, defying physics. The way the retro beats play together sounds almost childlike, and Lalin St. Juste’s voice is the perfect counterpoint, pouring through the spaces between keys and loops like honey. The only issue I have with this song is that I want so much more of it; at less than three minutes, this song will get a lot of repeat listens in anticipation of the full album release in October. [10/10]

by PopMatters Staff

23 Aug 2016


Photo: Jay Sansone

Eric Krasno has been a prolific musician over the past 20 years, co-founding both Soulive and Lettuce, while playing, producing and songwriting for a host of the music world’s leading lights, such as Tedeschi Trucks, Talib Kweli, Norah Jones and more. Stepping out on his own has allowed the virtuosic guitar master to quite literally find his own voice as he takes the mic for the first time revealing an affecting, gentle, bluesy soul man. On his latest single, “Jezebel”, Krasno lays out a mellow soul/blues vibe with some slinky, masterful guitar playing and a tale of love gone wrong.

by PopMatters Staff

22 Aug 2016


Tanner Smith: Two nocturnal 1990s icons team up for a spare, cinematic ballad that offers no surprises. “The Spoils” is immaculately constructed, featuring an understated, plaintive vocal performance from Hope Sandoval (who fronts the spectral Mazzy Star) and rich granular details that come from years of making records. The song’s beautiful, string-laden chorus feels like a sad, distant, and dying callback to the group’s incredible Blue Lines classic “Unfinished Sympathy”. But where “Unfinished Sympathy” captured the ambiguous rush of love, “The Spoils” details its fall into the abyss. “The Spoils” classicist leanings prove that Massive Attack don’t need to chase fads in order to create stirring and uniquely powerful music. [8/10]

by PopMatters Staff

22 Aug 2016


Chris Ingalls: Like that unwieldy parachute Katy Perry is dragging around in the video, the song is bloated and heavy-handed, but it’s kind of hard to get too jaded about something that’s basically the unofficial theme song of the Rio athletes. In that sense, the song works nicely and all the proper “inspirational” boxes are checked, both in the composition, Perry’s emotional delivery, and yes, that “you can do it!” video. [7/10]

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Virtual Reality and Storytelling: What Happens When Art and Technology Collide?

// Moving Pixels

"Virtual reality is changing the face of entertainment, and I can see a future when I will find myself inside VR listening to some psych-rock while meditating on an asteroid.

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