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by Will Rivitz

27 Jul 2016


Terribly Yours’ “Golden Age” is a synth-heavy piece of rock crusted with scuzz. It’s a relatively straightforward indie rock song, but it sounds like it’s being tuned through a staticky TV set, an atmosphere of fuzz weighing down its otherwise light instrumental. The guitar solo near the middle is serene, shining brightly through the muck. If you’re looking for a low-key way to kick off your Wednesday morning, this should do the trick.

by Will Rivitz

27 Jul 2016


Mail the Horse’s sun-baked indie rock rolls like endless plains on a cross-country road trip, relaxed nearly to the threshold of sleep. “Backlash” wavers under a sheet of dust, psych-rock guitars noodling over the twang of a subdued country backdrop. It’s the kind of rock as at home in a Williamsburg bar as a Topeka barn, a universal style meant to unite. This sort of county-fair indie will stay in our cultural consciousness until the day the last guitar is smashed onstage, so it’s a relief that “Backlash” proves we still have a ways to go before we hit the bottom of the barrel.

by PopMatters Staff

25 Jul 2016


Steve Horowitz: “Twin Cities, bitch!” Rhymesayers do it again. Atmosphere captures the humor and pathos of just trying to succeed when the deck is always stacked against you. The rap is grounded in the reality that failure really is funny, and as a fellow Minnesotan once said, “There’s no success like failure.” You don’t have to be as famous as Kanye to realize this. [8/10]

by PopMatters Staff

25 Jul 2016


Chris Ingalls: The title track from DJ Shadow’s first album in five years is the sound of an old pro showing the kids how it’s done. He does an admirable job of sounding current in a genre that is constantly evolving. The bed of synths that lies under the entire track provides a soothing atmosphere and blends nicely with the loud, jittery beats that swoop in. Spacey keyboard noodling gives the track a lovely, warm sci-fi vibe. Not the best thing DJ Shadow’s ever done, but a comforting reminder that he’s still with us. [8/10]

by PopMatters Staff

25 Jul 2016


Pryor Stroud: Fearless, corrosive, and smoking with Jeff Beck’s singularly expressive flamethrower-riffs, “Live In The Dark” is taken from the guitar icon’s LP Loud Hailer, his first in six years. The track conscripts vocalist Rosie Bones for its lyric, but, throughout, she seems to be grappling head-to-head with the wild electricity of Beck’s guitar. The tension this creates is a spectacle to behold: here, there is not one singer but two, a singer of flesh and blood and a singer of crackling feedback-figures. It may not be sonically inventive or lyrically deft, but its unadulterated, pyrokinetic take on rock is refreshing in a time when genre-bending has become something of a prerequisite for new artists. [7/10]

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Bad Graphics Are Still Impressive in ‘Spirits of Xanadu’

// Moving Pixels

"Spirits of Xanadu wrings emotion and style out of its low fidelity graphics.

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