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Thursday, Nov 6, 2014
This past year’s slate of films is another opportunity to consider cinema with an eye towards game design.

Last year around this time , I called for a continued engagement between game makers and film. Bridging creative mediums offers all sorts of fruitful lessons as we understand and experiment with storytelling. This past year’s slate of films is another opportunity to consider cinema with an eye towards game design. Movies matter to games and vice versa, so let’s take a look at some of 2014’s more interesting game lessons.


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Wednesday, Nov 5, 2014
I don't have a problem if you want to play Grand Theft Auto from a first person perspective. Knock yourself out. But I won't be doing so anytime soon.

So, a trailer appeared yesterday that indicates that the forthcoming release of Grand Theft Auto V for the newest generation of consoles will include a mode in which you can play the game from a first person perspective.


Which is fine, I guess.


I’m sure that there are fans of the series out there for whom this announcement will provoke great excitement, players who really love a first person playstyle and would love to experience one of Rockstar’s open world from this perspective. Which, again, is fine. I don’t have a problem with the option to play the game from different perspectives. Knock yourself out.


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Tuesday, Nov 4, 2014
by Marshall Sandoval
It’s refreshing when video games feel like they resonate with real places that I’ve been.

With my ear to the receiver, I’m listening to a guide on the flora and fauna of the Echo River. It’s 1:30 in the morning and I’m hearing Will Oldham aka Bonnie “Prince” Billy voice acting as a pre-recorded guide from the fictional Bureau of Secret Tourism. This was the way I discovered Here and There Along the Echo, the latest Kentucky Route Zero interlude from Cardboard Computer.


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Friday, Oct 31, 2014
The Last Door is Lovecraftian in every way that a story can be. It captures the mood, the intellectual curiosity, and the slow burn escalation of dread that typifies the best of Lovecraft.

Usually, when someone uses the term “Lovecraftian” to describe a work of horror, it’s meant to describe the antagonistic presence that drives the story. It’s shorthand for “ancient unknown evil.” But there’s more to Lovecraft than Cthullu, and The Last Door, a point-and-click adventure game by Spanish developer The Game Kitchen, is Lovecraftian in every way that a story can be. It captures the mood, the intellectual curiosity, and the slow burn escalation of dread that typifies the best of Lovecraft.


Tagged as: the last door
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Thursday, Oct 30, 2014
Horror is probably one of the toughest genres to pull off in video games, partly because of traditional video game conventions.

It’s that time of year when everyone’s looking for a little recreational fear. Over the past month, I’ve made an effort to play some scary games and think about how effective they are at creeping me out. It’s convinced me that horror is probably one of the toughest genres to pull off in video games, partly because of traditional video game conventions, because of the medium’s fundamental traits, and partly because of nebulous definitions of concepts like “horror.”


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