Latest Blog Posts

by G. Christopher Williams

3 Oct 2016

The forthcoming open world game Mafia III (2K Games, 2016)

The open world game has become a mainstay in contemporary gaming over the past decade and a half. As the beginning of the holiday season for gaming begins this month and continues into November, we know we’ll be seeing plenty of them.

This week then we look back at an episode from several years ago in which G. Christopher Williams, Nick Dinicola, and Mattie Brice discussed the ins and outs of open worlds.

by Nick Dinicola

30 Sep 2016

It’s not quite October, but it’s close enough. So begins another Indie Horror Month!

There’s something wonderfully meta about a game premised on exploring the deep, dark depths of the sea, that can only be found by exploring the deep, dark depths of Steam’s discount dollar game bin. Pricing itself at a measly $1.00, Reveal the Deep willingly burdens itself with low expectations, and then effortlessly swats them away. Save for the weirdly sparse main menu, this is a game that is smartly designed and polished well beyond its price point.

by G. Christopher Williams

28 Sep 2016

An image from one of the "True" Endings of Catherine (Atlus, 2011)

So, I did it. I finally managed to complete the 2010 classic horror game Amnesia (third times a charm, I guess). Knowing, as I did, that the game had multiple endings, though, I did that gamer thing. I reloaded the game’s final sequence two more times to also witness the game’s other two alternate endings.

My first playthrough resulted in what has been dubbed the “good ending”, my second completion was the game’s “neutral ending”, and finally I finished the game up with the “bad ending”. In particular, it was this ending, which fans call the bad ending, that gave me some pause. To me from both a narrative perspective and from a personal perspective, this “bad ending” seemed like the best ending possible. It seemed to me to be the most appropriate ending to the story of the amnesiac Daniel, ending the game with a conclusion that most clearly represented his final self realization and response to regaining his memory. In that ending, Daniel essentially destroys himself, allowing the shadow that has been hunting him throughout the game to catch up to him and kill him.

by G. Christopher Williams

26 Sep 2016

The Lion's Song (Mi'pu'mi Games, 2016)

As is our habit on the podcast, we occasionally like to sample what is going on in the free-to-play gaming.

This week we discuss three games available on Steam, A Date in the Park, Mandagon, and The Lion’s Songs as examples of lowbrow, middle brow, and high brow offerings within the free-to-play market.

by Nick Dinicola

23 Sep 2016

There are two endings to No Man’s Sky, and both are the very definition of anti-climactic. Fans that were already disappointed with the game latched onto the endings as justification for their feelings, undeniable proof that No Man’s Sky was a creative failure. But they’re wrong.

The endings certainly lack spectacle, especially the kind of destructive spectacle that defines a lot of games, but that’s the point. When you think about what kind of game No Man’s Sky is—the ideas it expresses, the things it considers important, and the things that it wants you to consider important—then these anticlimaxes become inevitable and revelatory. Together, they make a quiet yet grandiose statement about life’s relationship to the universe, expressed through the mechanics of gameplay.

//Mixed media

The Anti-Zen of 'Thumper'

// Moving Pixels

"There is no tranquility in the music, only menace.

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