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Wednesday, Apr 15, 2015
Titan Souls requires of its player only one thing: perfection.

The premise of Titan Souls, while unusual, is not entirely unique as anyone familiar with the 2005 cult classic Shadow of the Colossus should know.


While both Shadow of the Colossus and Titan Souls take place in fantasy-inspired universes, composed of magic, monsters, and men, a la Legend of Zelda and countless other games that have come in its wake, the actual living population of the worlds belonging to the aforementioned games, though, is much more sparse than that of a Zelda game.


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Tuesday, Apr 14, 2015
In the midst of all this human drama is the narrator, lavishing us with needless exposition.

There’s been a lot of digital ink spilled over the faults of Valiant Hearts, most notably concerning the game’s inconsistent tone and the overall direction of the game. On the one hand, the game wants to be a serious examination of the horrors of war through the eyes of those affected by the first major conflict of the 20th century. While on the other, it wants to be a rollicking, pumped up action ride of pulp sensibilities, mustachioed villain and everything. It’s not so much that the fun, action-oriented pulp storyline featuring Baron Von Dorf is terrible, just that it should have been a separate game from the melancholy “family torn apart” storyline. It’s the back and forth between these two plotlines that let diminished Valiant Heart‘s promise.


That’s all well trodden ground and is material that would be quite easily excised from any potential remake. I feel the game suffers from another division of purpose, one that is more subtle and not quite easily extracted from the whole. It’s not so much a single element or series of elements, but a matter of one element that exists throughout Valiant Hearts. It’s a pattern best exemplified by this one overly pandering element: the narrator.


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Monday, Apr 13, 2015
The Cat Lady is a game that is interested in the horrors of grappling with depression and anxiety, despite its often horror-movie-inspired presentation.

For a video game designed within a game genre known for its often less spectacle-driven storytelling, The Cat Lady is surprisingly brutal, violent, and often appalling.


That being said, it is also a horror game that is more interested in the horrors of real life, depression and anxiety, than it is in its gorier and terrifying backdrop. This week we discuss the 2012 indie game and what it might have to say about the kind of horrors that real people grapple with everyday.


Tagged as: podcast, the cat lady
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Friday, Apr 10, 2015
In Out There, the only enemy is the universe itself, and no one really expects the universe to be fair.

I like watching people play FTL, a roguelike space adventure in which we’re a lone ship fleeing a powerful rebel empire, but I don’t like playing it myself. The random nature of events that define a roguelike and that make it so much fun to watch also made for a frustrating and disheartening play experience. For me, at least.


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Thursday, Apr 9, 2015
While the deadly realm of Westeros is a far cry from the calm Pacific Northwest, the two experiences are not as removed as you might think. Both games bend genre expectations and explore their narratives while fully aware of their opportunities.

Warning: This article contains spoilers for Telltale’s Game of Thrones and DONTNOD’s Life is Strange.


I am contemplating whether or not to kick someone off a 700 foot wall. An hour earlier I was just trying to decide what to have for breakfast. The first takes place in the cold north of Telltale’s Game of Thrones, the second occurs in DONTNOD’s Life is Strange, two adventure game siblings in what is now quite clearly a genre renaissance. While the deadly realm of Westeros is a far cry from the calm Pacific Northwest, the two experiences are not as removed as you might think. Both games bend genre expectations and explore their narratives while fully aware of their opportunities.


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