Call for Music Writers... Rock, Indie, Urban, Electronic, Americana, Metal, World and More

 
Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Friday, Aug 8, 2014
Tower of Fortune has been an enlightening reminder of what “random chance” really means.

Tower of Fortune is an iOS RPG that has you climbing the titular tower to rescue your daughter. It’s a stripped down experience, perfect for mobile platforms: You only have to manage a few stats, and you only have one attack. You eventually earn new swords and equipment that make you stronger, but in truth, there’s very little tactical depth to the game. Everything from combat to fun times at the pub—actually, that’s kind of all you can do. That’s the totality of Tower of Fortune, fighting and drinking—all of which is determined by random chance. And this is not a bad thing.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Thursday, Aug 7, 2014
I now realize that basically everything Nintendo makes is meant to be portable.

Last weekend I did quite a bit of portable gaming, but it wasn’t the handheld variety. Instead of pocketing a DS or Vita, I packed up my Wii U and headed over to Jorge Albor’s place to play Mario Kart and invent new curse words. The process of bundling up my normally sedentary console made me realize that every Nintendo console that I’ve ever owned has had at least some component of mobility thanks either to the marquee games or novel hardware.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Wednesday, Aug 6, 2014
Travel in and the exploration of the game world in Sepulchre is neither linear, nor multilinear. It is nonlinear.

This discussion contains spoilers for Sepulchre, a 20 minute long free point-and-click adventure. So, feel free to download and play it at Owl Cave Games web site before reading on.


A train might seem like the worst metaphor possible for a video game. We are often reminded (or at least often hope) that what makes video games different from other artistic mediums, like novels, films, or music, is their ability to tell a different kind of story. We talk a great deal about player choice, divergent paths as a result, and the possibilities of a multilinear experience. Quite the opposite of a train (or most novels, films, and music), the video game affords the opportunity for branching paths and different resulting conclusions. Indeed, if a game is “on rails,” this usually isn’t considered a positive—at least from the perspective of narrative progression.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Monday, Aug 4, 2014
This week we discuss "In Harm's Way," the middle episode of The Walking Dead game.

While Telltale Games released the fourth episode of the second season of The Walking Dead a couple of weeks ago, we want to spare you spoilers for the most recent episode. Instead, we’re talking about the middle episode “In Harm’s Way” this week.


So, take a look back with us at Clementine’s confrontation with the villainous Carver and his totalitarian approach to the zombie apocalypse.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Friday, Aug 1, 2014
One Finger Death Punch is about the visceral, addicting, and euphoric pleasure of the fight.

One Finger Death Punch is a brilliant game that manages to wring every drop of entertainment and excitement out of a simple concept. It’s a 2D martial arts fighting game that evokes nostalgic memories of those pre-YouTube viral videos Xiao Xiao, which show stick figures battling it out in impressively animated and choreographed action scenes.


You are a student of the martial arts, on a journey to… y’know, it doesn’t matter. You travel around a map and get in lots of fights. The story is nonexistent. One Finger Death Punch is about the visceral, addicting, and euphoric pleasure of a fight. It’s about the beauty of violence, the ballet of combat, and every system in the game works to reinforce these ideas. As such, One Finger Death Punch may be the most mechanically perfect game since Fez.


Now on PopMatters
PM Picks
Announcements

© 1999-2014 PopMatters.com. All rights reserved.
PopMatters.com™ and PopMatters™ are trademarks
of PopMatters Media, Inc.

PopMatters is wholly independently owned and operated.