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by G. Christopher Williams

22 Feb 2012


I’ve spent 68 hours in Isaac’s basement.  It’s a horrible place full of blood, vomit, and excrement.  But I keep going back.  I don’t why.

Okay, I do know why.

It’s a game about me.

by G. Christopher Williams

20 Feb 2012


While those of us who write in the Multimedia section focus a good deal of our time on video games, quite a number of us also have a certain fondness for games of a non-digital sort.

Rick Dakan, Jorge Albor, and myself got together a few weekends ago to discuss our boardgaming habits, the difference between the Eurogame and Ameritrash (sorry, Rick), and how being a computer gamer might relate to being a board gamer.

by Nick Dinicola

17 Feb 2012


I’ve always hated the online pass. I’ve always thought that it was inherently anti-consumer, a greedy nickel and diming of gamers, justified by the self-righteous call to “help the developer.” I’ve always hated it, except when I liked it.

I’ve always liked EA’s “Project Ten Dollar.” I’ve always thought that it was clever to reward people that bought a game new with a coupon with some free downloadable content. It’s positive reinforcement, a “you’ll catch more flies with honey” type of marketing. I’ve always liked it, except when I hated it.

by Jorge Albor

16 Feb 2012


I watched Jackie Estacado grab a man by the feet and then literally rip that man’s spine out through his anus, and I think I liked it. Afters hours of playing The Darkness II, I have disemboweled and torn to pieces so many screaming men that I fear for my sanity. Have I grown so accustomed to wanton slaughter that ripping someone in half evokes only a momentary shock before fading into the backdrop of video game violence? Now might be a good time to reassess that question of video game violence and gore in particular before we let gradual technological progress sneak moral questions past us while we remain fixated on the light show in front of us.

To be fair, there is a comical element to the ludicrous dismemberment portrayed in The Darkness II. Enemies all look like clones of each other and therefore lose their semblance of humanity pretty quickly. The mutated and mask-wearing opponents also distinguish themselves from regular human beings, making their messy and violent passing a little less disturbing. The game is also rendered in non-photorealistic cel-shading, giving everything a sketchy comic-book feel, distancing itself from our own moral universe.

by G. Christopher Williams

15 Feb 2012


The premise of The Binding of Isaac seems a skewering of religion, as the game parallels the story of Abraham’s willingness to sacrifice his son, Isaac, with tendencies towards religious mania and child abuse.  The game begins by introducing us to a more contemporary version of Isaac and his mother, an avid viewer of Christian television.  Believing that she has heard a voice from God that has instructed her to purge Isaac of evil, she aims to do so.  This request, to purge her son of evil, is put to her twice before the more ominous command to kill her son is finally given.

Thus, begins the game, a shmup and rogue-like that obviously owes something to games like Zelda, Bezerk, and Diablo.  Isaac’s attempts to escape his fate lead him to flee down a trapdoor in his room into an underworld full of grotesque monsters that he battles with his own tears (the “bullets” of this shmup).

//Mixed media
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'Knee Deep' Has a Great Setting That Ruins the Game

// Moving Pixels

"Knee Deep'S elaborate stage isn't meant to convey a sense of spatial reality, it's really just a mechanism for cool scene transitions. And boy are they cool.

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