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by G. Christopher Williams

13 Dec 2010


Bethesda’s latest iteration of the Fallout series offers Sin City as one of the last remaining beacons of hope in their postapocalyptic American Wastleland.  Despite the buggy quality of the game at release, many players still found themselves “all in” for this expansion of the retro-futuristic universe.

This week the Moving Pixels podcast crew discuss the subtleties of socialization, scrounging, and survival in New Vegas.

by Nick Dinicola

10 Dec 2010


Most of Metro 2033 takes place underground in the dilapidated tunnels of Russia’s metro system. Normally this would be a poor setting for a game since metro tunnels are by necessity a repetitive environment. However, while many big budget games take great pains to send the player all over the world during their single player story—to the snow level, the desert level, or the jungle level—Metro 2033 proves that such grand gestures aren’t necessary. Repetitive scenery isn’t repetitive if handled correctly, and Metro 2033 handles it correctly: The tunnels may stay the same but what fills those tunnels is very different; by contrasting the overpopulated metro stations with the desolate tunnels, the game creates a world that feels both claustrophobic and frighteningly empty.

by Jorge Albor

9 Dec 2010


Math Blaster counts as an educational game, right? So does Oregon Trail, and probably Foldit, that shockingly addictive protein folding game. These games foster a particular type of narrow learning, emphasizing isolated details and contexts. Some game developers, however, are working on creating civic learning games, an entirely different class of educational game, one that fosters civic involvement and ethical thinking. According to a conceptual framework put forward by Chad Raphael, Christine Bachen, Kathleen-M. Lynn, Jessica Baldwin-Philippi, and Kristen McKee, Bioware might be on the forefront of educational game designer. This is why—with well over two million sales in its opening week—Mass Effect 2 is one of the most successful educational games of all time.

by Rick Dakan

9 Dec 2010


I’m excited for the Tron: Legacy movie tomorrow, and in my fervor I convinced myself it was a good idea to go buy and play the Tron: Evolution game since it acts as a bridging story between the first and second movies. At the checkout counter in Best Buy, the young man at the register aksed me, “Cool, is this about riding around on motorcycles and shooting people?” He’d never seen the original Tron and knew nothing about it. I didn’t know where to begin, so I just left it at, “It’s more complicated than that . . .” and paid for my game. On my way to dinner with a friend later that night, I was telling the story and he (who’s my age) asked, “Where does Tron happen? In a computer or a bunch of them?” I had no idea. We talked through it some, combining our memories of the movie with my couple of hours spent with the new game. The end result was just another question. What the hell is Tron anyway?

by G. Christopher Williams

8 Dec 2010


Didn’t video games used to be about saving the world or at least a princess or something?

I ask this question as I consider the sorts of games that I have been playing lately.  Sure, Fable III, Fallout: New Vegas, and Assassin’s Creed: Brotherhood all contain elements that concern a civilization on the brink of disaster and the player’s role in providing a solution to that threat to the world or region or city-state.  However, I have been noticing a tendency on my part when playing these games (especially Fable III and Brotherhood) to get much more involved in the economics of these games and my own investment in them than in paying attention to the noble goal (the common good) of the main plot.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

'Sugar Hill' Breaks Out the Old-School Zombies

// Short Ends and Leader

"Sugar Hill was made in a world before ordinary shuffling, Romero-type zombies took over the cinema world.

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