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by Mike Schiller

19 Oct 2010


For a franchise like Dead Space, multiplayer is the logical “next step”. 

Dead Space was a beautifully realized game, a legitimately frightening over-the-shoulder shooter whose technique of punctuating long stretches of quiet with jump scares and panic inducing swarms made for a genuinely satisfying gaming experience.  The lack of multiplayer, while notable, didn’t seem like an omission so much as it did a stylistic decision; the difficulty of putting a believable excuse for multiplayer in a game so focused on isolation was immediately evident.  Dead Space forced us to play single-player, and many of us loved it anyway.

As such, it’s a little surprising to see multiplayer introduced in its sequel.  Without really knowing much about the storyline of Dead Space 2 (given that it won’t be released until January at the earliest), all we have is the first game to go on as a basis for the multiplayer, and the inclination is to think that the focus of the game will have to significantly shift in order to accommodate a multiplayer mode.  It doesn’t make sense, given the context, so the context needs to change.

by Nick Dinicola

15 Oct 2010


I’ve never wanted to play a Facebook game. This is probably due to a combination of factors, the two biggest being my indifference to Facebook in general and my dislike of the mouse as a controller. However, in the past few weeks, I’ve logged on to Facebook more times than I have in the past several years, all because of Project Legacy, the Assassin’s Creed Facebook game.

I love the Assassin’s Creed series, so I’m not surprised that it’s the catalyst that got me gaming on Facebook. What is surprising is how the developer managed to translate the Assassin’s Creed experience from an open-world adventure to what feels like a menu-driven RPG.

by Jorge Albor

14 Oct 2010


Gamers are used to the grandeur of large scale environments. It seems the sheer size of a game world is one measurement of the success of Triple-A titles. The same can be said of many films that aim to enthrall viewers in a vast landscape, fantastical or otherwise. Admittedly, there is a strong visual appeal to enormity. The visual spectacle of Lord of the Rings conveys the magnitude of the film’s quest. Similarly, swooping down over a valley in Dark Void or traversing an open desert in Red Dead Redemption can evoke an overwhelming sense of awe or even solitude.

Conversely, there is an entire sub-genre of adventure games that emphasize small enclosed spaces: “escape the room” puzzles. Most of these are flash based games playable in a browser. They are some of the hardest and most complex gaming experiences available, which have earned them a massive and devoted fan base. These games also have their film counterparts, some of which succeed in many ways that these games have not. These confined experiences, some isolated to just a single room, evoke entirely different sensations than huge and sweeping tales and can teach us a great deal about game design as well.

by G. Christopher Williams

13 Oct 2010


I lack imagination. I know that now.

Playing Minecraft has taught me something: I don’t know how to play.

However, by that, I don’t mean that I don’t know how to play Minecraft. I mean that I don’t know how to play. At all.

Maybe I should explain.

by Kris Ligman

12 Oct 2010


Kingdom Hearts. What was once regarded as an ambitious and experimental mixture of East and West animation traditions now seems to have completely separated like oil from water in its latest installment, Birth by Sleep. So what happened?

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Hozier + Death Cab for Cutie + Rock Radio 104.5's Birthday Show (Photo Gallery)

// Notes from the Road

"Radio 104.5's birthday show featured great bands and might have been the unofficial start of summer festival season in the Northeast.

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