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Wednesday, Apr 7, 2010
Darksiders offers nothing especially new in terms of teaching the player to kill, but what it it does do better than many games is teach the player to be a more efficient and effective murderer by changing up some existing mechanisms of training the player in the deadly arts. Largely, this boils down to creating some rules for murder.

I’m getting better at killing.  It stands to reason, since I’ve had good instruction.


I have written before about how highly stylized violence is used in games as an encouragement to learn their combat systems (”Splatter Porn and Additionally Strange Visual Stimulation in Video Games”, PopMatters.com, 17 June 2009).  I was also extremely appreciative of the way that Bayonetta provides a means of practicing combos between the action during loading sequences (”Learning from Loading Screens: The Pedagogy of Bayonetta, PopMatters.com, 20 January 2010).  Finally, I have also considered the various strengths and weaknesses of active and passive styles of tutoring players in various gameplay principles (”Active Learning: The Pedagogy of the Game Tutorial”, PopMatters.com, 16 September 2009).  However, rarely have I been schooled in slaughter so well as I have been in playing Darksiders.


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Tuesday, Apr 6, 2010
Perhaps synthetic worlds have begun to offer a new mythology.

As the MMO grey market profits pass into the billions and the populations of the games themselves now exceed several small nations, the question of whether or not we should take synthetic worlds seriously has ceased to be relevant. More important questions about how these places work, what kinds of culture arise there, and what they imply for the future are all being explored. One of the most important books on the topic of synthetic world economies is Edward Castronova’s Synthetic Worlds. Based principally on his experiences with Everquest, the book outlines the basic set up that a synthetic world needs to induce trade and create an artificial economy.


The thing that you’ve got to grasp about a synthetic economy is that the money in the game “is just a convenience for recording choices and their effects. The economy is the choices, not the money by which I register choices and their effects” (174). So saying something like, “one gold piece equals 100 silver pieces and that’s the economic system” is missing the point. The economy is instead grounded on a series of structured institutions like market-making, monetary policy, transportation, and banking to just name a few. To have an economy, the game must have trade. To facilitate trade, you need specialization. One person can get resource X but not Y, another person is in the opposite position. To make sure that these two folks get to talking, you make sure that the design imposes a lot of needs on the player. These needs must be resolvable by consumables more than durables. A consumable would be a good that is used up after one use like a health potion. A durable is something like armor that you can use repeatedly but degrades over time. Any MMO should avoid permables or items that never degrade because there’s not much point in them existing. You always want people to need something to keep the economy going. (184) Eventually once a large enough group of people all think the same things are valuable, then they become valuable. There doesn’t have to be anything more to it. Money is valuable because we think it is, not because it does anything by itself. (102)


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Monday, Apr 5, 2010
This week we continue in our series on storytelling in video games by discussing a broader sample of the kinds of relationships that are explored in the stories told by video games.

A lot of the discussion in the media on the kinds of relationships that video game characters foster can be boiled down to discussions of Tommy Vercetti beating up hookers and taking back his money following an “initmate encounter.”


This week we continue in our series on storytelling in video games by discussing a broader sample of the kinds of relationships that are explored in the stories told by video games. We consider the centrality of “getting the girl” to player motivations in many gaming experiences and whether or not games can tell more complicated stories of love and romance.


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Friday, Apr 2, 2010
You’re proving yourself as a leader and a lover.

This week I finally finish my look at the loyalty missions of Mass Effect 2 with Garrus, Jack, and Legion, as well as providing a few thoughts on how these missions play into potential romances.


Garrus
When we first meet Garrus, he’s fighting off three groups of mercenaries by himself. The rest of his team has been killed by a traitor, Sidonis, who then escapes, leaving Garrus alone in this tough situation. Of course, he gets out of it alive thanks to Shepard, but he feels personally responsible for the death of his squad and that guilt drives his desire for revenge.


Tagged as: mass effect 2
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Thursday, Apr 1, 2010

While Playing God of War 3, my eyes kept skittering away from the big TV screen to the bookshelf in the corner. There sat a hard back copy of William Vollmann’s novel, Europe Central. I kept thinking to myself, I’ve seen this story before somewhere, or at least I’ve felt this way before. As Kratos threw aside all care and decency in his quest for violent vengeance, and Zeus and the other Olympians showed gargantuan disdain for anything but their own desires, the revelation hit me. This game is just like Europe Central!


OK, OK, I admit that on the face of it, God of War 3 is nothing like Vollman’s epic novel. That book is all about introspection, narrative experimentation, and the horrors humanity is capable of. God of War 3 is really all about the eye-goggling visuals, wild quick-time events, and over the top design. Maybe they’re more alike than I thought now that I put it that way. Both focus on style as much as they do substance. The difference is, Europe Central clearly means for the reader to feel just awful about everything that transpires on its pages. I’m not sure what feelings God of War wants me to have.


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