Latest Blog Posts

by Sean Miller

5 Jan 2016


Seth Indigo Carnes, Flux Poetics, 2011

In January, I’ll be teaching a course at Portland Community College called “Apps as Art: Learn to Code Apps that are Artistic”. At the risk of sounding hyperbolic, as far as I know, this is the first course of its kind being offered in the world. Thus far, enrollment has been good, and it looks like the course is a go.

Part of the course’s novelty is the newness of the medium that we’ll be focusing on, the mobile app. I’ve written previously about the medium’s promise, as well as some of the reasons why the range of work currently being done in it is so sparse. Digital art has been around for almost as long as computers have been. Internet art has existed since the ‘90s. But due to the mobile app’s youth, and the perceived barriers to entry, it’s still the Wild West.

by G. Christopher Williams

4 Jan 2016


In two weeks, we’ll be talking about our picks for the best video games of 2015, but this week, we remain focused on one of the better reviewed iOS games of 2015, 80 Days.

Inspired by the Jules Verne novel, at once 80 Days takes the player on a tour of a prior century, but with its more overtly steampunk trappings and frequently more modern social attitudes, the game presents a branching narrative that allows the player to explore an ever changing world.

by Nick Dinicola

18 Dec 2015


Some time ago I wrote a post praising Ubisoft for its dedication to climbing in the Assassin’s Creed games and Grow Home. I complained out loud that the grappling hook set to be introduced in Assassin’s Creed: Syndicate was just a concession to gamers who want to speed through an open world as fast as possible, treating the space as an obstacle to be passed rather than as an environment to be appreciated. Thankfully, that’s not the case. As it turns out, the grappling hook is really pretty awesome.

by Jorge Albor

17 Dec 2015


I fell in love with Fallout 4 when my journalist companion Piper published a story about me. Then I fell out of love when Piper took a misstep off a forty story building and plummeted to what would have been her death, except companions cannot die. Now she’s wearing my dead husband’s wedding ring, and honestly, I’m kind of confused.

I’ve had a love-hate relationship with the Fallout series before. When Bethesda released Fallout 3 in 2008, I took the claim that the game adapted to my play style at face value. “If I can really do anything and the game will adapt,” I told myself, “then I’m going to play the game entirely evil.” It turns out shooting most everyone on sight makes for a boring wasteland experience. I loved the daring approach to player agency, but found myself hindered by my own particular approach to Fallout. Our own Erik Kersting described this phenomenon well in his exploration of a particular Fallout 4 memory sequence: “Video games are simultaneously their own best friend and worst enemy when it comes to pacing. They can give the player tons of tools to experience the narrative, but they cannot force the player to necessarily have that experience.”

by G. Christopher Williams

14 Dec 2015


I’m halfway through the follow up to the 2013 reboot of the Tomb Raider series, this year’s Rise of the Tomb Raider.

It’s fine.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Supernatural: Season 11, Episode 12 - "Don't You Forget About Me"

// Channel Surfing

"In another stand-alone episode, there's a lot of teen drama and some surprises, but not much potential.

READ the article