Latest Blog Posts

by G. Christopher Williams

8 Jun 2015


Context matters, or so we are told.

So, this week we consider how thematic, aesthetic, and narrative contexts effect how we understand the mechanics of the games that we play.

by Nick Dinicola

5 Jun 2015


Chronicles: China is a small game relative to its franchise counterparts. It’s a 2D side-scroller, not an open world adventure, and priced at only $10, it presents itself as an even smaller package than its downloadable peers (China takes a lot of inspiration from Mark of the Ninja and that game is $15). Naturally, changes must be made to the typical Assassin’s Creed formula to fit it into this very different package, and China succeeds in this regarding its mechanics and systems (mainly by mimicking the mechanics and systems from the aforementioned Mark of the Ninja).

Yet, its narrative remains a sprawling adventure, an excuse to travel from historical locale to historical locale. It’s a narrative uniquely unsuited to the 2D side-scroller genre, and it’s interesting to watch the game bend over backwards as it tries to shove as much plot as it can between levels. China is an unfinished product, but only from a story standpoint. Its gameplay systems and art and level design are all quite well-done, but it’s clear that they were the priority. The story remains an outline that never got revised.

by Jorge Albor

4 Jun 2015


I had barely scratched the surface of The Witcher 3: The Wild Hunt, the epic fantasy open-world game that features well over a hundred hours of action/magic/sword-fighting gameplay, when I decided to sit down and play Gwent, an optional card game within the game. The game crashed after my first win, and I haven’t been back since. I think I need a break from all the seriousness of gaming.

See, I don’t think I have had fun playing games lately, at least not the jovial free-spirited form of fun that I associate with child-like playfulness. The world of The Witcher is dark and rough. Geralt, who sounds like someone constantly waking up from a nap, lops off heads and runs quests for murderers and racists. It’s not exactly a light romp through magic-land.

by Brian Crecente / Tribune News Service (TNS)

3 Jun 2015


This year’s E3 will include a first for the 20-year-old annual international gaming convention in LA: limited public access.

While E3 has traditionally been an industry event that doesn’t officially allow consumers onto its game-packed floors, this year the show is allowing 4,000 to 5,000 of some of gaming’s biggest fans into the Los Angeles Convention Center halls to wander as invited guests.

by Nick Dinicola

29 May 2015


White Night is a striking game to look at. It’s all black and white with hard shadows to give shapes definition, like a Sin City panel come to life. At first, the game seems to contain the perfect combination of art and story.White Night is a tale in the tradition of noir, but about a haunted house. Its hard shadows hide the violent ghosts of an angry mother, and its light streams from the protective ghost of an innocent lover. It’s a beautiful and haunting game to look at, but it’s a rather annoying game to play. And it’s annoying largely due to its beautiful and haunting art.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

A Chat with José González at Newport Folk Festival

// Notes from the Road

"José González's sets during Newport Folk Festival weren't on his birthday (that is today) but each looked to be a special intimate performance.

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