Latest Blog Posts

by G. Christopher Williams

15 Jun 2016


I’ve now played about a dozen games of Dead of Winter, and I think that it is the best purely cooperative board game that I have ever played. The reason that this co-op game plays so well is because I play it so selfishly.

The trouble with co-op board gaming is the group. The group is always smarter than the board.

by Boen Wang

14 Jun 2016


I am in here, in a room of myself. Bare walls, bad carpeting, used furniture. Two open windows through which no breeze blows. No air conditioning, either. The box fan’s droning on at full speed. My screen’s aglow and my hands grip the controller. Primary colors and vector graphics. Skittering drums and chiptune synths. I’m playing Flywrench, and I’m dying a lot. My chair’s shedding dandruff-like flakes of pleather. I’m sweating and twitching and staring. I’m dying and retrying and dying in the hopes that I can make it to the next level and do it all again. It’s more the humidity than the heat. I am in here.

by G. Christopher Williams

13 Jun 2016


SUPERHOT isn’t the first reconsideration of the first person shooter, but its slow motion violence and methodical approach to murder certainly has made an impression.

by Nick Dinicola

10 Jun 2016


Tomb Raider Go is a mobile game that ignores all the blockbuster action of its console cousins in favor of clever puzzles. The Lara Croft in Tomb Raider Go is not a survivor or warrior, she’s… well… a tomb raider. It’s a wonderful alternative to the console game and received quite a bit of praise upon its release. Uncharted: Fortune Hunter is a similar game with a similar goal, but it hasn’t received anywhere near the amount of acclaim as Lara’s game. Part of this is likely due to its nature as a tie-in game with the recently released Uncharted 4, whereas Tomb Raider Go stood confidently as its own game. However, it’s also likely that Fortune Hunter has gotten less notice because the puzzles in it feel very different. 

Tomb Raider Go is arguably the better designed puzzle game, but Fortune Hunter better captures the tone of Uncharted—a spirit of improvisation and adventure—that is missing from Lara’s game. It’s all about the puzzles.

by Nick Dinicola

3 Jun 2016


The last time that I wrote about One Finger Death Punch, I wrote about it from a purely mechanical perspective—about how its deceptively simple premise hid a wealth of excellent design decisions that all work in perfect harmony with each other. I also talked about its mechanics, but from a philosophical point of view more than anything else.

Going back to the game in preparation for a Moving Pixels podcast, I’ve been reminded how excellent it still is, but also that that excellence stems from more than just mechanical harmony. There’s a purity of focus to the game. It’s the only action game that I’d think to describe as zen, but why? What makes this game from such a “disreputable developer” so much more immersive than every other action game ever made?

//Mixed media
//Blogs

The Specter of Multiplayer Hangs Over 'Door Kickers'

// Moving Pixels

"Door Kickers is not a multiplayer game, but for a while there, I couldn’t tell the difference.

READ the article