Latest Blog Posts

by G. Christopher Williams

6 Aug 2012


Despite games often being thought of as a mental exercpoise, they certainly have a physical component too.  We aren’t talking about how games test your reflexes, though. Instead, what we are interested in is how games simulate physical experiences and how those experiences add to our immersion in game worlds and heighten the drama in video game storytelling.

by Nick Dinicola

3 Aug 2012


Dear Esther is an unsettling game. It’s not violent or disturbing but eerie in a very memorable way. The Lost Archive DLC for Assassin’s Creed: Revelations is, to my surprise, similarly unsettling. The DLC continues that game’s odd first person puzzles with narration, but this time the narrated story isn’t Desmond’s story and that completely changes the tone. Both games revolve around the same concept: reliving someone else’s memories. And both games use similar tricks to create a sense of unease and tension even when there’s no danger of failure, since the entire story revolves around stuff that’s already happened.

by Jorge Albor

2 Aug 2012


Tell Tale’s The Walking Dead has earned a bevy of critical praise—and for good reason. Sharp writing, gorgeous artwork, and Robert Kirkman’s compelling source material create a thoroughly entertaining piece of admittedly minimally interactive fiction. Although the episodic game’s completion is far from over, the current releases prove that a well told story told in an episodic format can set itself apart from both epic triple-A titles and one-off indie adventures. Yes, The Walking Dead is a well told piece of storytelling, regardless of its length, but the short episodic form make the game’s features that much more interesting and engaging.

Currently only five games make up the entire collection of Walking Dead episodes. The game follows the story of Lee Everett, a man headed to prison for murder before the zombie infestation changes everything. Early in the first episode, Lee befriends a young girl named Clementine and becomes her guardian. He also meets up with another rag tag group of survivors. As expected in post-apocalyptic fiction, the conflict within the group poses as much of a threat as the undead masses outside their hurriedly assembled shelter.

by G. Christopher Williams

1 Aug 2012


When playing League of Legends a question that is asked with some degree of frequency is: “U mad?” The question is frequently asked following the death of an opponent that has died many times previously. Or, it is asked as such an opponent begins to complain about his teammates or the unfairness of his multiple deaths.  At that point, someone on the opposing team wants to know: “U mad?”

Now I realize that this phrase is a meme, but there is a reason for making fun of someone for being angry. As a long time gamer, I’ve been vaguely baffled by this question. I’d never heard it during a game before now, and to be perfectly honest, I can’t recall ever being especially interested in how my opponents in a competitive game felt.

by Nick Dinicola

27 Jul 2012


Broken Sword: The Sleeping Dragon was the first of the venerable point-and-click adventure series to make the leap to 3D. Playing it now evokes a weird kind of wonder. As a fan of the series, it’s undeniably awesome to see a 3D model of George Stobbart and Nico Collard, even though it’s a horribly dated game in terms of graphics. But what’s more interesting is how the new dimension impacts the gameplay and how those changes both lessen and heighten the sense of adventure in the game.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

The Moving Pixels Podcast Discusses 'Tales from the Borderlands Episode 2'

// Moving Pixels

"Our foray into the adventure-game-style version of the Borderlands continues.

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