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Thursday, Jun 12, 2014
I find myself paying attention to E3 every year, even though I probably shouldn’t.

I’m writing this on June 8, 2014, the day before E3 kicks off. By the time you’re reading this, all the drama has been dissected many times over. The booths have been packed up, winners and losers have been declared, and many a snarky GIF has been made. I’m nowhere near the whirling vortex of pounding music and perspiring participants that is the LA Convention center, but I will be watching. View this as a retroactive explanation or perhaps even as an apology. E3 is obnoxious, but I still go out of my way to watch it.


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Thursday, Jun 5, 2014
These blasted landscapes between civilization and chaos reveal how vacuous normative roles can be.

Warning: This post contains spoilers forThe Walking: In Harm’s Way.


Telltale’s The Walking Dead is a series about societal roles. As Lee Everett in the game’s first season, you take on the role of a leader, a fighter, and a father. Sometimes you embrace these aspects of the character willingly, other times they are foisted upon you. Navigating the world of The Walking Dead is largely an act of managing the social obligations that we all carry, every day, heightened to an apocalyptic intensity.


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Thursday, May 29, 2014
Who’s in charge in Transistor? Maybe nobody.

This post contains spoilers for Transistor


Transistor is a story about people struggling to maintain control over an ever-shifting situation.  Everyone in the game, be they heroes, villains, or the average citizen, are fooled into thinking that they have exerted a lasting influence over others.  Diversity somehow finds a way to trump their efforts, even the efforts of the person holding controller.


Cloudbank, the game’s high tech cityscape, makes promises of power and influence to its citizens, but it does so in a way that is both limited and prone to arbitrary decision making.  On the surface, the city seems like a democratic success; “users” can vote on everything from city planning projects to the weather and the winners get to see their plans enacted.  In reality, this capricious mass has a hard time staying focused on any long-term structural change.  Votes go back and forth and random pieces of architecture make for odd juxtapositions.


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Thursday, May 22, 2014
Netrunner is a constant battle of wits and aggression, a struggle for power, for constant dominance... except when it isn't.

Netrunner is a game of mega-corporations advancing their nefarious agendas while protecting their servers against anarchic, criminal, and DIY hackers. The game creates a beautiful asymetric system (which I delve into in greater detail here), a tense and shifting play space that creates some of the most exhilarating tabletop gaming matches you can experience. Netrunner is a constant battle of wits and aggression, a struggle for power, for constant dominance… except when it isn’t.


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Thursday, May 15, 2014
Miasmata offers what has become a rare experience in both video games and the real world: the feeling of being utterly lost.

It might not be very idealistic or heroic sounding, but one of the things I like about video games is the comfortable boundaries they offer.  Whether it’s a function of technology or creativity, you know your place in a virtual world, usually in a very precise way.  Eventually you’ll run into an invisible wall that prevents you from wandering off the level or you’ll hit a door that isn’t actually a passageway into a building but rather a decorative ornament on a solid wall.  If you have a map, it functions by some glorious system of auto-cartography, filling itself in as you wander new areas.  As you travel, a dot marking your position charts your path and shows your exact location.


In this respect, the rise of smart phones has made life a lot more video game-like.  If you’re wandering around the overworld (i.e., not in a building and within your carrier service area), you’ll have a map that will fill itself in with your surroundings.  On that map is a dot that shows your exact location as well as the location of various landmarks.  Because of this dynamic, I’m more likely to treat going to a new place in the real world the same way that I’d treat it in a video game; I’ll just head over and try to figure it out.  Getting lost is a momentary setback remedied by a quick glance at a magic map.


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