Latest Blog Posts

by Jorge Albor

24 Mar 2016

Warning: This article contains massive spoilers for Pandemic Legacy. Yes, spoilers for a board game.

It’s October, and the world is ruined. Zombie-like fallen have taken over all of Europe and are now pushing into Latin America and Asia. Cities around the world are rioting. Some have collapsed or completely fallen. St. Petersburg is a nuclear wasteland. And I’m to blame.

by Jorge Albor

10 Mar 2016

Firewatch (Campo Santo, 2016)

Sometime later this month or early next month, thirty-five masochists will meet up in Frozen Head State Park outside Wartburg, Tennessee to run what is widely accepted as the most difficult marathon in the world. The Barkley Marathon, held annually since its inception in 1986, has been finished only sixteen times. It’s a brutal, multiloop, hellscape of a race. It’s also an inspiring example of design.

When we criticize game design, we often bring up the concept of clarity in a variety of forms. How clear is the interface? How clearly does the game communicate its goals? Is progression clear? Does it tell the player where to go next? Or what things that the player is doing wrong? Clarity is an excellent game design goal. Except for when it isn’t.

by Jorge Albor

25 Feb 2016

Captain Volibear and Constable Trundle from League of Legends (Riot Games, 2009)

Get your bag of popcorn ready folks, Riot Games just formalized their penalty index for their regional and global competitive events. This index includes a set of rules that all teams and players must abide by while participating in League of Legends competitive events. Violating these rules result in some strict penalties, from slap-on-the-wrist warnings to fines of $20,000 and indefinite suspension from League of Legends.

Many of these rules have already been punishable and have been enforced by Riot Games already, and this set of rules merely codifies and normalizes what has already been a normal process. By publishing these commandments, players know what transgressions are punishable and the extent of the punishment connected to them, new players to the scene have an easy reference of things not to do, and fans have some transparency into the punishment process. This should settle some of the drama that inevitably arises when Riot levies fines… maybe.

by Jorge Albor

11 Feb 2016

That Dragon, Cancer (Numinous Games, 2016)

I think that people are mostly good. I think the world is—generally—becoming a better place, and that we have the capacity to fix most of the problems that ail our society. I think that one day mankind will take to the stars and that our stories will long outlive our little star. I’m a hopeful person.

At the same time, it’s hard not to succumb to despair, be it the petty kind that you might feel each time Donald Trump appears on national television, or the existential kind that you feel when you’re in a crowded space (Times Square might as well be a black hole on the face of the earth). If there’s a word for the simultaneous feeling of hope and despair, it’s in a language that I don’t speak—or one that I have long forgotten.

by Jorge Albor

28 Jan 2016

Netrunner is a beautiful game. Its theme resonates wonderfully throughout every set of cards, and the asymmetrical gameplay makes for a rare and deeply compelling power struggle between corporations and hackers. I love it, I really do, but I find myself unsatisfied with its lack of a distinct casual format, especially as a means of recruiting new players.

I have tried about a dozen times to get my friends into Netrunner. For a game that features punk rock hackers and corporations that create murderous sleeper clones, it’s a surprisingly difficult game to proselytize. The game is popular, absolutely, and those that get into it tend to border on the obsessive once they go all in, but making the game truly accessible to new players is difficult.

//Mixed media

Tricks or Treats? Ten Halloween Blu-rays That May Disrupt Your Life

// Short Ends and Leader

"The best of this stuff'll kill you.

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