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by Jorge Albor

17 Dec 2015


I fell in love with Fallout 4 when my journalist companion Piper published a story about me. Then I fell out of love when Piper took a misstep off a forty story building and plummeted to what would have been her death, except companions cannot die. Now she’s wearing my dead husband’s wedding ring, and honestly, I’m kind of confused.

I’ve had a love-hate relationship with the Fallout series before. When Bethesda released Fallout 3 in 2008, I took the claim that the game adapted to my play style at face value. “If I can really do anything and the game will adapt,” I told myself, “then I’m going to play the game entirely evil.” It turns out shooting most everyone on sight makes for a boring wasteland experience. I loved the daring approach to player agency, but found myself hindered by my own particular approach to Fallout. Our own Erik Kersting described this phenomenon well in his exploration of a particular Fallout 4 memory sequence: “Video games are simultaneously their own best friend and worst enemy when it comes to pacing. They can give the player tons of tools to experience the narrative, but they cannot force the player to necessarily have that experience.”

by Scott Juster

10 Dec 2015


As we wind down for the holidays, I want to float a theory about why some games make me mad. It’s a theory that may cost me my spot on on Santa’s nice list, but I’ll say it anyway.

I rarely get mad at games themselves. I get mad at the people I’m playing with.

by Jorge Albor

3 Dec 2015


I think I backed That Dragon, Cancer shortly after its Kickstarter went live in 2014. The game is a memorial of sorts to Joel, a son lost to cancer at a very young age.

I must have known about my brother-in-law’s bladder cancer diagnosis by then. I must have. But for the life of me, I can’t remember how I found out. I know I walked with him at a bladder cancer awareness walk in May of earlier this year. We were Team Paul, as we supported him at the race, all of us decked out in orange t-shirts supplied by the organizers of the event. He got to wear a special “Survivor” badge, proudly displaying his membership in a group that he never imagined he’d join.

by Jorge Albor

17 Nov 2015


I like to think I have lived a life without regrets. But wow, I didn’t really get things right the first time, did I? No one really does. Coming of age, that long and never ending process, is more like stumbling through a half lit home than walking a beaten path. We fumble and grope around in the dark, hoping to find something we think we want and trying to compose ourselves as better people.

Nina Freeman’s Cibele is a window into that personal process, a game that manifests the borderlands of youth in the shiny pink and purple screen of a young woman’s computer. Cibele is very much an autobiographical story, but it resonates with an almost unsettling familiarity, especially for those who lived through the early Internet era of chat rooms and livejournal.

by Scott Juster

5 Nov 2015


We’re still a ways away from knowing if Activision’s purchase of King (makers of Candy Crush and all manner of games with “saga” in the title) was a good investment, but I can definitely see the logic behind it. If you take a bigger look at Activision-Blizzard, they’re more than just a Call of Duty factory or an MMO machine. They’re in the business of making experiences that are ongoing services rather than one-off purchases. Buying King gives Activision-Blizzard a shot at cementing that much sought after concept of “engagement” that is currently driving the video game industry as well as the overall technology sector.

//Mixed media
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You Should Dance Like Gene Kelly Today

// Global Graffiti

"In the glut of new "holidates", April and May offer two holidays celebrating the millions who preserve and promote the art of dance

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