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Monday, Apr 11, 2011
Playing on trains and playing with time. The Moving Pixels podcast looks back on Jordan Mechner's classic The Last Express.

At Tom’s suggestion, the Moving Pixels podcast crew decided to take a trip back in time to have a look at Jordan Mechner’s 1997 game, The Last Express.


A thriller/mystery packaged within the structure of a kind of much more interactive Choose Your Own Adventure, this point-and-click adventure is really not exactly like any of the genre categories that I just listed.  Featuring a very different approach to the concept of a video game script and some interesting ways of playing with time, The Last Express is quite unique, offering a very mature and very innovative approach to interactive storytelling worth mulling over even a decade later.


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Monday, Apr 4, 2011
This week the Moving Pixels podcast looks at the evolution of the dungeon crawl from its social aspects and etiquette to its mechanics and playstyle.

Dungeons & Dragons might be its low tech form, but video games have not strayed far from the formula of getting some friends together, killing some monsters, and collecting loot.  From Gauntlet to Diablo to Torchlight, the hack and slash game is an experience both social and individualistic, steeped ironically in both greed and co-operation.


This week the Moving Pixels podcast looks at the evolution of the dungeon crawl from its social aspects and etiquette to its mechanics and playstyle.


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Monday, Mar 28, 2011
The Moving Pixels podcast wonders how well retro games hold up with rapidly changing platform generations, as well as higher expectations for graphics quality and overall accessibility.

An aborted effort to play retro classic Maniac Mansion leads to a discussion by the Moving Pixels crew about differences between older and newer games.


We wonder how well retro games hold up with rapidly changing platform generations, as well as higher expectations for graphics quality and overall accessibility.



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Monday, Feb 7, 2011
With gameplay that may or may not do service to its plot but featuring some talented voice acting and direction alongside expressive motion capture and beautiful graphics, does Enslaved manage to tell a good story?

Response to Enslaved has been divisive.  Most agree that the game does not feature the most outstanding gameplay, but after acknowledging that, opinions vary a great deal. 


Most divisions about Enslaved arise around its storytelling.  With gameplay that may or may not do service to its plot but featuring some talented voice acting and direction alongside expressive motion capture and beautiful graphics, does Enslaved manage to tell a good story?


This week the Moving Pixels podcast crew discusses the success or failure of Enslaved‘s somewhat controversial storytelling.


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Monday, Jan 31, 2011
Shifting settings from the mall to the casino, the Dead Rising series hasn't changed in its commitment to gross excess and superficiality.

Shifting settings from the mall to the casino, the Dead Rising series hasn’t changed in its commitment to gross excess and superficiality. 


In a similar sense, much of the approach to grappling with the zombie hordes has not been altered significantly in the 2010 follow up to Dead Rising.  The player is still tasked with killing zombies and psychos, while ensuring the safety of as many of his fellow survivors as he can.  The more subtle changes (“subtle” being a term that is normally very rarely applied to a Dead Rising title) come in terms of combat tweaks, some changes in difficulty, and some very different psycho fights.


This week the Moving Pixels podcast crew discusses the good and bad in those changes and whether or not the follow up is a worthy successor to one of the more popular early titles of this hardware generation.


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