Latest Blog Posts

by G. Christopher Williams

14 Mar 2016

This week we consider the multicultural mash up in this indie from last year, a game that includes concerns about robots and body augmentation alongside passages from The Tibetan Book of the Dead.

Cradle asks questions about the soul, the body, and the relationship between those two things and advanced technology. In the podcast, we discuss its concern with incarnation and reincarnation in a culture in which science and reason are ascendant.

by G. Christopher Williams

7 Mar 2016

Metal Gear Solid V marks the end of nearly 30 years of the Metal Gear saga, one of the longest running series in video gaming history—at least with its creator Hideo Kojima at the helm. It seems important to consider the game given Kojima’s effort to wrap up the series by connecting its latter day iterations with its origins, but also how even now how inventive Kojima is in reconsidering the game’s mechanics and gameplay.

So, this week we consider this fresh, but final take by Kojima on the world of Solid Snake and Big Boss, a stealth game executed astonishingly well within an open world setting.

by G. Christopher Williams

29 Feb 2016

Unfortunately, thanks to a scheduling snafu, we don’t have a new episode for you this week. We will be back with an all new episode next week, though, talking about last year’s blockbuster Metal Gear Solid V.

In the meantime, we will try to tide you over with something from our back catalog, an episode concerning that ever present video game standard, the tutorial.

by G. Christopher Williams

22 Feb 2016

Limbo (Playdead, 2010)

A couple of weeks ago, we ran our first “Best of the Moving Pixels Podcast” episode, a series in which we intend to reach into our archives and pull out some of our more interesting discussions from the past. We began on a rather upbeat note with a discussion of love and relationships, so we figured it might be good to balance our optimism with a seemingly more pessimistic topic, death in video games.

To be honest, though, given the unlimited lives made possible by this medium, death becomes a less than inevitable outcome in the world of video games and may serve several rather interesting functions. Thus, in this episode, we considered the value of death in games, as a possible lose-state, as a form of punishment, as a way of learning, or even sometimes as a form of pleasure.

by G. Christopher Williams

15 Feb 2016

Cibele is Nina Freeman’s autobiographical look at a first experience of love in an online space.

So, it seems somewhat fitting on the day after Valentine’s Day for the Moving Pixels podcast to consider what we can learn about romance and courtship through a video game.

//Mixed media

Indie Horror Month 2016: Executing 'The Deed'

// Moving Pixels

"It's just so easy to kill someone in a video game that it's surprising when a game makes murder difficult.

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