Latest Blog Posts

by G. Christopher Williams

26 Aug 2013

Another day, another zombie apocalypse, and 400 Days gives Telltale Games another chance to test our humanity within the context of said apocalypse.

Join our podcasters as we consider the right and the wrong of interacting with hungry zombies and maybe even hungrier humans—and, of course, when it might be most appropriate to shoot another guy’s leg off.

by G. Christopher Williams

29 Jul 2013

This week the Moving Pixels podcast revisits the muddled, half crazed genius of Suda 51’s Killer 7. Well, at least some of us revisit it. For Eric Swain and Nick Dinicola this is their first go round with what might be the quintessential Suda 51 title.

We’ll consider the madness, the vulgarity, the downright frustrating mechanics, and also how Suda provokes and interrogates gaming through what was most Americans first glimpse of one of video games’ most colorful auteurs.

by G. Christopher Williams

15 Jul 2013

This week most of our regular bloggers take a peek at the zombie apocalypse as translated by Uncharted developer Naughty Dog. This episode Nick, Eric, Scott, and Jorge discuss The Last of Us.

by G. Christopher Williams

1 Jul 2013

This week the Moving Pixels podcast considers how we take the supposed “meta” elements of gaming for granted. But then considers how these elements contribute or detract from the drama and realism of the gaming experience.

by G. Christopher Williams

3 Jun 2013

Monaco is a multiplayer stealth action game oozing with retro style with a touch of neon noir flair.

This week Nick Dinicola and I discuss both the single player and multiplayer experience of a game that features a nod to the meticulous planning of the heist and all the frenetic pleasure produced by getting the chance to play out that moment when all that planning goes terribly wrong. Ironically, it is this lat bit that makes the game great. Monaco reveals the pleasure of making mistakes.

//Mixed media

Because Blood Is Drama: Considering Carnage in Video Games and Other Media

// Moving Pixels

"It's easy to dismiss blood and violence as salacious without considering why it is there, what its context is, and what it might communicate.

READ the article