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by Mark Filipowich

25 Oct 2011


According to the romantics, imagination is the means of crossing into the spiritual and returning with a message of Truth.  The poet, Percy Bysshe Shelley writes that: “Reason is to Imagination as the instrument to the agent . . . the shadow to the substance.” For the romantics, poetry (defined usually as expressive language and including prose and music) reveals eternal truths whereas other disciplines only measure finite and temporary facts. Poetry was a looking glass for the soul and held messages from the divine. However out of vogue that thinking is now, in the Dragon Age universe, it seems that this sense of romanticism holds considerable weight and that the two poet figures, Leliana and Verric (figured here as as bards), are elevated to a romantic status.

Whatever is going on in Dragon Age, be it racial tension, religious corruption, or class warfare, the figure of the poet remains untouched. Just as the romantics and their descendents argued, Dragon Age portrays a world in which poets have privileged knowledge, an almost prophetic understanding of their world and societies. They feel more deeply and are more in tune with a power that supposedly everyone has access to.

by G. Christopher Williams

24 Oct 2011


So, as my colleague in podcasting, Rick Dakan, observed, this week’s episode is a little self indulgent (but that’s okay, I guess, as I just wrote a little about the relationship between self indulgence and gaming last week).

We have been wanting to discuss a bit about how it is that “the gamer” identity is formed, so we spent some time chatting a bit about our own relationship to games and gaming and how we came to play the ways that we do.  We consider our relationship to chess, sports, board games, and RPGs and what these things might have to do with who we are.  Confessional as some of this discussion might be, there are some interesting similarities that emerge between our experience of growing up as gamers.

by Nick Dinicola

21 Oct 2011


Death is rarely scary in games, mainly because it’s so common. As with anything else that we experience multiple times, death loses its impact. This is an obvious dilemma for horror games. Death is only scary when we don’t die. But when a horror game embraces this contradiction and helps the player stay alive for as long as possible, it becomes truly terrifying in a way that few games can manage.

by Scott Juster

20 Oct 2011


A couple weeks ago, Jorge and I embarked on a journey.  With full wallets, empty bellies, and half-tucked shirts, we journeyed to Subway.  Purchasing some food allowed us to stave off hunger and gain early access to Uncharted 3‘s multiplayer.  I was particularly fond of the beta, so this was an opportunity to get another chance to check out the full mode as well as to test a relatively new means of promoting and marketing a game.  Now that I’ve had the time to play the game a bit more and to reflect on the promotion itself, I feel like my opinion regarding fast food sums up the Uncharted 3 multiplayer early access experience. It was immediately satisfying, but I fear it’s ultimately unhealthy.

by G. Christopher Williams

19 Oct 2011


I only half watched Sony’s new “Michael” ad late one night (see below if you haven’t seen it yet), as I was fixing myself something to eat during a commercial break.  I stopped, somewhat mesmerized by the array of video game characters that suddenly appeared as (more or less) live action characters on my television screen.

The sight of a “real” Solid Snake discussing war in a throaty whisper was what gave me pause. Then I was kind of charmed by a portal opening behind the flaming head of Sweetooth and catching a fleeting glimpse of Chell briefly flitting by.  It was the Little Sister, peering at me through the crowd in that ever eerily distant way, that left me a little stunned.

I’m not sure exactly why.  It was seeing that strange creature transported out of her home medium into the “real world” of the televisual that made me realize that “my characters” had somehow arrived in what I think of as the “real” mainstream media.  You know, television, that thing that my mother and father watch, not video games—that space left for me (a late-thirtysomething in obvious arrested development) and the kids.

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