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Monday, Aug 9, 2010
The Moving Pixels crew gets lost in the shadows and ambiguities of Limbo's haunting, little world.

Well, if you have been following the Multimedia section of the site for the past few weeks (and if you haven’t there are links below), you know that quite a few of our regular contributors have had a lot to say about Playdead’s Limbo (and we aren’t alone on the Internet).  Having had our chance to have our say individually, the Moving Pixels podcast crew decided to hash out our thinking about the game collectively.


The resulting discussion considers the significance of the game from an artistic perspective, what we feel it gets right and gets wrong, and generally gets lost in the shadows and ambiguities of the game’s haunting, little world.


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Friday, Aug 6, 2010
Limbo is a nightmare. A dark, ethereal, and dangerous world filled with giant spiders, malicious kids, screaming machinery, and by the end, you’re no closer to understanding any of it than when you began.

I love horror games, but too many of them mistake cheap scares and gore for horror. True horror isn’t disgusting, it’s disturbing; it doesn’t make you jump, it makes you think. True horror is subtle, never showing all of its cards because the more that you don’t know, the more frightening it is. In this way, Limbo is the best horror game that I’ve played in a long time.


Limbo is a nightmare. Which is not to say that it’s hard, though some of the puzzles will strain your grey matter. You won’t jump out of your seat at regular intervals. Limbo is a nightmare because it’s disturbing in a way that’s difficult to understand. This is a dark, ethereal, and dangerous world, one filled with giant spiders, malicious older boys, and screaming machinery, and by the end, you’re no closer to understanding any of it than when you began. Limbo is filled with dream-like imagery that might be whimsical in any other context (rotating worlds, levers for rain), but here such images make Limbo feel like a waking nightmare.


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Thursday, Aug 5, 2010
Deathspank sounds uninvitingly dumb.

Comedy is hard. It’s much easier to do solid drama and liven it up with a few moments of humor than it is to do something creative that’s meant to be funny top to bottom. No one expects every joke in a funny game or movie to land perfectly, but there is some golden ratio of funny to amusing to ignorable to unfunny that every good comedy nails and every bad one gets wrong. I think Deathspank gets the ratio wrong, and I think that the problem starts with the name.


First, let me say that Deathspank is a fine game, and I’ve enjoyed my time playing it. But mostly I enjoyed it in spite of the humor rather than because of it. There’s some laugh worthy material in there but not enough for me. Worse yet, the stuff that doesn’t work not only fails to make me chuckle, it actually weighs against the game in my estimation. I recently spent time vacationing at the home of some friends who have an Xbox that’s primarily for the use of their children, who are 4 and 9. My visit coincided with Deathspank‘s launch, and the game’s ever present advertisement on the first screen of Xbox Live every time one of the kids wanted to play Lego Indiana Jones or Monkey Island. “I cannot wait until the word Deathspank is no longer part of my daily life,” she said to me. This is someone who has a fine sense of humor and enjoys playing through a game like Monkey Island with her kids, and she did not find the title amusing.


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Wednesday, Aug 4, 2010
A little boy is dismembered in Limbo with an astonishing regularity.

I’ll be posting an episode of the Moving Pixels podcast next Monday, in which we discuss Playdead’s Limbo.  Having completed our recording it occurred to me that we had never discussed one element of the game: a little boy is dismembered in Limbo with an astonishing regularity.


Surprisingly (it would seem), this issue just never came up.  However, the weird thing is that, having played the game, this imagery not coming up does not entirely surprise me.  I frankly gave it little thought during my own playthrough.


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Tuesday, Aug 3, 2010
At the end of the fourth season, LOST abandoned mimicking the content of video games and instead focused on how they characterize space.

An excellent article at PopMatters by Elwyn Palmerton details the many similarities of the first four seasons of LOST with adventure games. One of the show’s creators, Damon Lindelof, has noted that the game Myst was a big inspiration, and it makes sense. A remote island filled with unexplained mechanical gadgets, the slow process of gaining access to these areas, and other video game plot devices are scattered throughout the show. Keys and objects are often the focus of the plot, characterization occurs during the static flashbacks, and much of the show is spent moving from different locations. The show’s first four seasons so heavily resemble a classic adventure game narrative that several spoofs have appeared suggesting what a Lucasarts version would be like. There are a few other video game aspects of the show that I thought were worth pointing out, particularly ones that develop after the period of the show that Palmerton’s article covers. At the end of the fourth season, LOST abandoned mimicking the content of video games and instead focused on how they characterize space.


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