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by Rick Dakan

28 Oct 2010


My favorite moments from Fallout 3 came out of a collaboration between the creative output of the designers and my own imagination. The game set up situations in which moral decision was entirely in the hands of the player: help the slavers or fight them, save the villagers or exploit them, the good of the many or the good of you. In one quest I recovered a pristine, powerful rifle that belonged to Abraham Lincoln. I held onto this gun, not using it but hoarding ammunition, until I’d leveled up to the point where I felt strong enough to take on the slaver camp head on. I attacked at night, and the only weapon that I used was Lincoln’s rifle. I freed the slaves and literally blew the head off the slaver bastards. The game gave me the requisite XP and rewards, but the greatest pleasure I got from the whole experience was the symbolism that I’d laid upon it.

For all it’s bugginess and slightly outdated graphics and stiff animations, this is the area where Fallout: New Vegas shines most brightly, presenting you with compelling moral quandaries and letting you make decisions. Having added a nifty Reputation system into this game, the consequences of those decisions now vary across the wasteland. Some will love you, while others will hate you for what you do, as is the way in the real world, where the moral landscape is a jumbled mass of prejudices, preferences, and pretensions. Even so, the game’s options usually come down to questions that the vast majority of people would agree upon about what is moral and what is immoral (killing innocents for your own gain is bad, killing psychopathic killers is good). However, there are a few exceptional set-ups where morality is much less clear, and the ones that fascinated me the most were a pair of quests centered around sex slavery and prostitution.

by G. Christopher Williams

27 Oct 2010


In most games, inventory management is unlikely to be seen as a form of pleasure.  Utilitarian and, perhaps, a necessary evil?  Maybe.  But fun?  Not so much.

While inventory management seems a kind of compliment to the style of play of games like RPGs—after all, a large component of the RPG is collecting bigger and better weapons to compliment one’s steadily increasing power—it tends to be an element of gameplay largely included as a means of creating boundaries for characters (the player shouldn’t have access to everything and anything during their adventure) and authenticity (nor would they literally be able to).  Basically, inventory management forces the player to make choices but very often not especially interesting ones.  Since I have limited room to carry stuff around, should I take the +4 STR sword or the +5 STR sword?  Not the trickiest of puzzles to solve in a gameplay environment.

by Kris Ligman

26 Oct 2010


It was just a couple months ago, in one of my school’s many theaters, that someone announced that a member of our screenwriting faculty, none other than Jack “Top Gun” Epps, Jr. himself, had recently penned a video game adaptation of his popular 1986 film. Our faculty were clearly proud, congratulatory as they might be over a coworker’s newborn son, but something was off about the incident. Namely, that I myself got caught up in the enthusiasm.

“Oh, I should check that out when I get home,” I thought.

“Wait,” I said a second later. “Why?”

by G. Christopher Williams

25 Oct 2010


Image of Fei Long from Gizmag

This week the Moving Pixels podcast crew discuss how gamers are taught to play.  We discuss the effectiveness and ineffectiveness of game tutorials, revisit consideration of the game manual, and generally think about how game tutorials and other forms of learning effect the gameplay experience.

by Nick Dinicola

22 Oct 2010


Commentary tracks are considered a standard special feature for any DVD, some even offer multiple tracks. For games, this kind of look behind the scenes is still treated as something rare, usually reserved only for “special editions.” Yet, they’re slowly becoming more common, so perhaps it’s time to point out some of the successes and failures, looking at two cases in particular: Alan Wake, and The Secret of Monkey Island 2: Special Edition.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Mr. Robot: Episode 6 -- "Br4ve-Trave1er.asf

// Channel Surfing

"When episode six opens to find Elliot in terror and panic, it is soon confirmed that he should be.

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