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by G. Christopher Williams

27 May 2015


I read an interview with John Carmack, the creator of Doom, some time ago in which he was asked what was the most important element of the success of Doom, the game that essentially soldered down the centrality of the first person shooter to American video gaming culture. His response was simple: speed.

What Romero said that what he set out to do with Doom was to create the fastest gameplay experience that he possibly could, and anyone who has played the game should easily understand this explanation. The player’s role in Doom is to essentially play as a roving gun platform, a really, really fast roving gun platform, that simply massacres monsters en masse and as fast as possible.

by G. Christopher Williams

26 May 2015


Last October on our Halloween themed episode, we briefly alluded to a 20 minute indie horror point-and-click game by Owl Creek Games called Sepulchre.

We admired the game for its moody tone and understated horror, but it seemed too brief an experience to devote a whole podcast to. With the release of The Charnel House Trilogy, Owl Creek decided to build upwards and outwards from that central story into a new triptych of tales in which Sepulchre serves as the centerpiece.

by G. Christopher Williams

22 May 2015


Pac-Man in the forthcoming film Pixels (Columbia Pictures, 2015)

A maze with dots. That’s about all it was, just a maze filled with dots.

You earned points for eating those dots. You were rewarded with a new level for eating all of the dots.

by Nick Dinicola

22 May 2015


In Dark Souls, you always knew when a boss was coming. The big bad was always behind a “fog door”, a wall of smoke that separated the boss arena from the rest of the level. It would automatically close behind you, locking you in, forcing you to fight or die. Fog doors became intimidating; they were warnings demanding your attention and respect, shouting at us “This way lies death!” Passing through the fog was not a decision to be taken lightly. Passing through the fog meant you were ready for a fight.

by Jorge Albor

21 May 2015


It’s hard becoming a better person. I want to know the right things to say, the right things to do, in every circumstance. Of course I am not perfect, but I can try to learn from past mistakes. This is, of course, easier said than done.

We human beings do not generally enjoy confronting our mistakes. It’s also not always clear where mistakes are made or who is most to blame. By the time a project or endeavor comes crashing down around you, it may be too late to find the crucial flaw in its design.

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