Latest Blog Posts

by G. Christopher Williams

9 Jul 2012


If you are at all interested in the creative process, in what makes creators tick, and how they deal with their creation once it is out there, you should see Indie Game: The Movie.

Of course, our Moving Pixels podcasters are interested in video games, but this week we discuss why Indie Game: The Movie should probably be seen by anyone interested in the creative arts.

by Mark Filipowich

3 Jul 2012


While playing through a pre-release version Resonance for review, I came across a number of obstacles that I struggled to overcome. The difficult line that puzzle games have to walk is that the player must be stumped—but only for a little while. Unfortunately, given that my review was time sensitive, getting stuck lost much of its charm in the last few days before its release. However, just before its official release, developer Wadjet Eye Games sent an email offering a walkthrough to any reviewers that thought they might need it.

I hadn’t come across a puzzle that I couldn’t figure out, but I worried that that time was coming. So, with a slight sense of shame, I asked the developers to pass along the walkthrough. It was an interesting offer that is pretty unique to games. It felt almost like getting offered a ten page summary for a book review or an extended “highlights” trailer for a film review. It felt like cheating. But walkthroughs can add a layer of depth to games.

by G. Christopher Williams

2 Jul 2012


We often discuss the complex economic systems generated by multiplayer games, in which players buy, sell, and trade with one another.  So why simulate an economy in a single player game?

This episode we discuss the economies of single player games, how they motivate action, how they provide players additional goals, and how they can just spiral out of control, simulating nothing that we can recognize from real life economics.

by Nick Dinicola

29 Jun 2012


Asura’s Wrath is a simple game that tells a simple revenge story. It doesn’t do anything new or interesting with this basic premise. This story progresses as you expect with the characters that you expect taking on the roles that you expect. There are no surprises… until the cliffhanger ending. Leaving aside the ethical issue of purposely cutting off the end of the game and selling it as DLC, this DLC is worth the price or at least a gander on YouTube (which is what I did) because the final four episodes take the crazy spectacle of Asura’s Wrath and mix it with some shockingly thoughtful themes.

by Scott Juster

28 Jun 2012


Anna Anthropy, game designer and author of Rise of the Videogame Zinesters

In her book, Rise of the Videogame Zinesters, game designer and critic Anna Anthropy argues in favor of a simple, yet radical change to the video game landscape.  Her mission is refreshingly straightforward, as is her prose: “What I want from videogames is for creation to be open to everyone, not just to publishers and programmers.  I want games to be personal and meaningful, not just pulp for an established audience.  I want game creation to be decentralized.  I want open access to the creative act for everyone.  I want games as zines” (Rise of the Videogame Zinesters, Seven Stories Press, 2012, p. 10).  She admits that it’s a daunting order, but then spends the rest of the book enthusiastically and convincingly showing that such a change is well within our grasp.  Her book, which could have easily been a simple polemic against entrenched publishers, instead becomes an optimistic guide for people of non-traditional backgrounds to take ownership of the medium.

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