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by G. Christopher Williams

30 Aug 2017


(Giant Sparrow)

I keep wanting to call What Remains of Edith Finch What’s Eating Edith Finch?. In a certain way, What Remains of Edith Finch has a few things in common with the film Lasse Hallström’s What’s Eating Gilbert Grape? (1993). They both feature oddly named characters, they’re both concerned about the way peculiar families function, and they both meditate on death at certain points in their runtime.

It’s this latter element that probably defines the major thematic interest of What Remains of Edith Finch, though, as the majority of the game is spent pondering the inevitable ends of Edith’s peculiar family members.

by G. Christopher Williams

23 Aug 2017


(Playdead)

It has been a year since the release of Inside, Playdead’s follow up to the cult classic Limbo. When I reviewed Inside last June, I talked about its themes but avoided spoiling the game’s ending, so it feels like it has been enough time now to consider that ending and how the game concludes with the embrace of a monstrous embodied form of collectivism.

The little boy that serves as the protagonist of Inside certainly stands out in the washed-out world of Inside. His bright red shirt marks him as unique in a world of muddy gray and starker black and white. This signals his individualism, his heroism, in the game.

by G. Christopher Williams

16 Aug 2017

Building a fort is a classic form of play. Be your material cardboard, wood, or just the sofa cushions, as a kid there’s something compelling about holing up while imagining battling the forces of evil and also something compelling about building a structure to serve as your home base for a little while.

Some of this pleasure, perhaps, speaks to the appeal of crafting and base building games. From Minecraft to Conan: Exiles to Rust, there’s clearly something bringing gamers back to the idea of spending some time gathering resources, erecting walls, and building a little oasis for themselves in the sometimes difficult environs of these games.

by G. Christopher Williams

29 Mar 2017


Dead Rising 4 is the Saltine cracker of the Dead Rising franchise. It’s just bland.

Yes, there are zombies, lots and lots of zombies. Yes, there are a ton of over the top weapons to cut up, electrocute, and burn huge swathes of the undead with. Yes, you can still wear silly outfits while doing such violence.

by G. Christopher Williams

8 Mar 2017


We Become What We Behold is a non-partisan game about politics, which is hard to imagine in such a currently divisive American and European political landscape. This is exactly the point of We Become What We Behold, though, examining the horror of the viral nature of divisiveness and tribalism.

The game begins simply enough, asking its player to watch and then photograph a small group of randomly wandering individuals. Photographing “interesting” things results in a hashtagged photograph that ostensibly goes viral enough to affect parts of the group. If we photograph the one “interesting” person who has chosen to wear a hat when no one else is doing so, this results in others adopting the look. In other words, hats become cool for some people, and they join the hat tribe.

//Mixed media

//Blogs

Stevie Wonder Takes a Knee as Green Day and Others Also Speak Out at Global Citizen Festival

// Notes from the Road

"The 2017 Global Citizen Festival's message for social action was amplified by Stevie Wonder and many other incredible performers and notable guests.

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