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by G. Christopher Williams

2 Sep 2015


Tengami (Nyamyam, 2015)

When I started writing seriously about games in 2002, most of what was being written about video games came largely in the form of previews and product reviews. Video games were still largely being covered as a form of entertainment, but largely anyone, like myself, pondering whether or not the medium might be more than a frivolous way of passing time existed only in fairly small numbers in pockets of the Internet.

As the decade progressed, though, more and more bloggers appeared asking questions similar to my own about whether or not video games were not just a pastime, but also an art form. Many mainstream gaming web sites began including essays of a more critical (that is, “critical” in the sense of art criticism) nature alongside the more traditional offerings of screen shots and consumer information about video games. Infamously, Roger Ebert declared that video games were not art, but by the mid 2000s, there were an awful lot of writers, some journalists, some academics, and some enthusiasts, talking about video games, their stories, their mechanisms, and even their possible aesthetics using that very term.

by G. Christopher Williams

5 Aug 2015


If you haven’t ever not played There Is No Game, I would recommend not clicking on this link to not play that non-game, as this article will slightly spoil There Is No Game. Oh, it will also kind of spoil the Sesame Street Little Golden Book classic The Monster at the End of this Book.

It is no surprise to me that There Is No Game was the winner of the recent DeceptionJam sponsored by Scirra, the maker of a game development program called Construct 2. The rules of this GameJam were to create a game using Construct 2 that presented the theme of “deception” in some fun and engaging way. There Is No Game seems like it had to be a shoe in for the top prize, as it is a clever and witty little “non-game.”

by G. Christopher Williams

29 Jul 2015

When she was a little girl in the late 1970s, my wife often spent the night at her grandmother’s house. She says that the thing that she remembers most about those visits (besides getting to play with any of her grandma’s costume jewelry that she wanted to) was waking up, coming downstairs, and seeing her grandma at the kitchen table, cigarette dangling from her lip, mug of coffee steaming on the table, and a deck of cards in her hand, dealing herself a game of Solitaire.

Especially since the advent of online gaming, every few years folks in the video game industry make predictions about the dismal future of the single player video game (see articles like ”Single-Player Games ‘Gone in Three Years’” or “EA: Single-Player Games are Finished”). Single player games are seen by some as a kind of aberration in the history of gaming more broadly. After all, traditionally the idea of playing a game of a non-digital sort, a board game or card game, is considered to have a social component.

by G. Christopher Williams

22 Jul 2015


Her Story kind of reminds me of collectible card games.

Okay, I know that that makes no sense. Just hear me out for a minute on this one.

by G. Christopher Williams

8 Jul 2015


Once the German mothers had submitted to the plea for overbreeding, it was inevitable that imperialistic Germany should make war. Once the battalions of unwanted babies came into existence—babies whom the mothers did not want but which they bore as a “patriotic duty”—it was too late to avoid international conflict. The great crime of imperialistic Germany was its high birth rate. It has always been so. Behind all war has been the pressure of population.
—Margaret Sanger, Woman and the New Race (1920)

The title of Massive Chalice is quite literal. There is, indeed, a massive chalice in the game.

Perhaps there is a sexual metaphor at play in the game’s title. After all, one of the central components of the game is sex and reproduction.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Country Fried Rock: Drivin' N' Cryin' to Be Inducted into the Georgia Music Hall of Fame

// Sound Affects

""If Drivin' N' Cryin' sounded as good in the '80s as we do now, we could have been as big as Cinderella." -- Kevn Kinney

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