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by G. Christopher Williams

22 Jul 2015


Her Story kind of reminds me of collectible card games.

Okay, I know that that makes no sense. Just hear me out for a minute on this one.

by G. Christopher Williams

8 Jul 2015


Once the German mothers had submitted to the plea for overbreeding, it was inevitable that imperialistic Germany should make war. Once the battalions of unwanted babies came into existence—babies whom the mothers did not want but which they bore as a “patriotic duty”—it was too late to avoid international conflict. The great crime of imperialistic Germany was its high birth rate. It has always been so. Behind all war has been the pressure of population.
—Margaret Sanger, Woman and the New Race (1920)

The title of Massive Chalice is quite literal. There is, indeed, a massive chalice in the game.

Perhaps there is a sexual metaphor at play in the game’s title. After all, one of the central components of the game is sex and reproduction.

by G. Christopher Williams

6 Jul 2015


With the arrival of a number of successful and interesting episodic games, this approach to gaming seems to be growing more and more common.

This week the Moving Pixels podcast discusses the possibilities and limitations of a crime drama in episodic game form, The Detail.

by G. Christopher Williams

24 Jun 2015


Two doors. Two lights. Eleven security cameras.

That’s it. That’s all you have to interface with the world of Five Nights at Freddy’s, a horror game about observation. Indeed, two out of the three things listed above are instruments that enhance observation.

by G. Christopher Williams

23 Jun 2015


Metal Gear Solid V: Ground Zeroes (Konami, 2014)

I said, ”Footsteps in movies.”
“Footsteps.”
“Footsteps in movies never sound real.”
“They’re footsteps in movies.”
“You’re saying why should they sound real.”
“They’re footsteps in movies,” she said.
Point Omega (Scribner, 2010)

The preceding conversation from Don Delillo’s novel Point Omega occurs between a documentary filmmaker, Jim Finley, and the daughter of a man who is the subject of Finley’s latest documentary in progress, a woman named Jessica Elster. It is probably no surprise that a documentarian would raise the issue of how reality may or may not be successfully depicted in film. Representing reality as authentically as possible would seem to be the bread and butter of most documentary filmmakers.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

'Five Came Back' Is an Unusual and Seminal Suspenser

// Short Ends and Leader

"This film feels like a template for subsequent multi-character airplane-disaster and crash projects, all the way down to Lost.

READ the article