Latest Blog Posts

by G. Christopher Williams

29 Mar 2017


Dead Rising 4 is the Saltine cracker of the Dead Rising franchise. It’s just bland.

Yes, there are zombies, lots and lots of zombies. Yes, there are a ton of over the top weapons to cut up, electrocute, and burn huge swathes of the undead with. Yes, you can still wear silly outfits while doing such violence.

by G. Christopher Williams

8 Mar 2017


We Become What We Behold is a non-partisan game about politics, which is hard to imagine in such a currently divisive American and European political landscape. This is exactly the point of We Become What We Behold, though, examining the horror of the viral nature of divisiveness and tribalism.

The game begins simply enough, asking its player to watch and then photograph a small group of randomly wandering individuals. Photographing “interesting” things results in a hashtagged photograph that ostensibly goes viral enough to affect parts of the group. If we photograph the one “interesting” person who has chosen to wear a hat when no one else is doing so, this results in others adopting the look. In other words, hats become cool for some people, and they join the hat tribe.

by G. Christopher Williams

1 Mar 2017


I own hundreds of games. I mean, hundreds.

I have two big bureau drawers full of physical copies of console games, I have boxes of old PC ROMs, and I, of course, like many gamers, have a ludicrously long list of games in my Steam library.

by G. Christopher Williams

22 Feb 2017


I’m not a big fan of Minecraft.

Admittedly, I haven’t played the game since it was still available in its beta state as a browser game. However, this is not to say that I begrudge anyone else’s love of the game. I realize that it is very, very clearly a lot of other people’s type of game, though, not my own. Playing Minecraft just taught me something about the kinds of games that I do like to play (which I wrote about at the time, see, ”I Don’t Know How to Play”, for example), more civilized and structured ones.

by G. Christopher Williams

18 Jan 2017


This post contains major spoilers for This Is the Police.

Tragedy isn’t a genre that video games handle especially well. I’m talking about classical tragedy, a story about a protagonist that is going to lose, like Macbeth or like King Lear. You may already see where I’m going with this. Video gamers are not accustomed to playing to lose.

Winning is, generally speaking, the essential goal of games. Earn the most points, complete all of the challenges, or “beat the game”, these are all measurements of win-states. Lose-states are what the gamer intends to avoid.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

How a Song By Unknown Newcomer Adam Johnston Ended Up on Blondie's New Album

// Sound Affects

"Adam Johnston of An Unkindness wrote a song at 17 years old and posted it online. Two years later, magic happened.

READ the article