Latest Blog Posts

by G. Christopher Williams

28 Mar 2012


This post contains spoilers for some of the possible outcomes in Mass Effect 3.  Some might argue that I have already spoiled part of the game with the title of this essay.  However, I could just as easily be discussing Mass Effect 2 or Mass Effect 3.  Frankly, anyone with an interest in reading discussions of any Mass Effect should realize, though, that the death of squadmate in these games is something that may or may not happen anyway.  I’m just warning you about the fact that I’m getting into the details of a possibility.  That such possibilities exist should come as no real surprise.  Oh, I also spoil a major plot point from a game that is 15 years old.

When Tali died, I so wanted to go back to my last save point.

by G. Christopher Williams

21 Mar 2012


It might be just me (and admittedly I hear that thanks to a very different vocal performance by Jennifer Hale that playing as a female Shepard creates a very different tone for the Mass Effect series) but on loading up Mass Effect 3 all I could think was, “Damn, this is a macho game.”

Okay, it wasn’t on loading the game up.  It was really a sense that emerged when participating in the first in-depth conversation (in-depth conversation being a hallmark of the series and of the Bioware oeuvre)  in the game with one of Shepard’s crew members, James, that I started getting this very macho vibe from the game.

by G. Christopher Williams

14 Mar 2012


Nintendo makes toys.

I’ll see if I can explain what I mean.

I’m vaguely excited every time that I see an ad for Kid Icarus: Uprising for the Nintendo 3DS.  I don’t own a 3DS.  However, I did own an NES back in the day, and I did own Kid Icarus.  It wasn’t a very good game.

by G. Christopher Williams

22 Feb 2012


I’ve spent 68 hours in Isaac’s basement.  It’s a horrible place full of blood, vomit, and excrement.  But I keep going back.  I don’t why.

Okay, I do know why.

It’s a game about me.

by G. Christopher Williams

15 Feb 2012


The premise of The Binding of Isaac seems a skewering of religion, as the game parallels the story of Abraham’s willingness to sacrifice his son, Isaac, with tendencies towards religious mania and child abuse.  The game begins by introducing us to a more contemporary version of Isaac and his mother, an avid viewer of Christian television.  Believing that she has heard a voice from God that has instructed her to purge Isaac of evil, she aims to do so.  This request, to purge her son of evil, is put to her twice before the more ominous command to kill her son is finally given.

Thus, begins the game, a shmup and rogue-like that obviously owes something to games like Zelda, Bezerk, and Diablo.  Isaac’s attempts to escape his fate lead him to flee down a trapdoor in his room into an underworld full of grotesque monsters that he battles with his own tears (the “bullets” of this shmup).

//Mixed media
//Blogs

The Thoughtful Absurdity of 'Spaceplan'

// Moving Pixels

"Spaceplan is a goofy game that still manages to pack a potent emotional punch.

READ the article