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by G. Christopher Williams

30 Mar 2011


Just like any game, conversation can be a pleasure, but you need to consider a few basic rules, boundaries, and the like in order to effectively achieve goals—for one, not alienating the other “players”.

Which is one of the things that I like about the Dragon Age series, its ability to integrate having a conversation into the gaming experience itself.  While Bioware’s other series, like Mass Effect, also create a game-like quality to conversation itself, that other series tends to isolate conversation, favoring developing relationships with characters on a one-on-one basis.

by G. Christopher Williams

16 Mar 2011


Madcap isn’t a descriptive word that I use very often, but it certainly applies to Radical Dog’s The Man with the Invisible Trousers.

From the opening menu, in which you can choose from options like “Play” or “Don’t Play,” it’s obvious that tautology informs the game in terms of both its randomized narrative as well as its absurd physics, one thing matters about as much as another.

by G. Christopher Williams

9 Mar 2011

Tell Me a Story by
Aerawen-Vanhouten

It has become a kind of self deprecatory mantra of the games criticism community: video games generally don’t tell very good stories.  Which is true.  And we need to stop saying it.

Heard of that medium called the movies?  Yeah, most of them are terrible. 

Heard of film critics?  Those guys know that movies are generally pretty lousy, but they don’t talk about it all the time, nor do they apologize for it.

by G. Christopher Williams

2 Mar 2011


If Bulletstorm is intended to be deliberately stupid, it really needs to get a whole lot stupider.

When I first saw some gameplay teasers of Bulletstorm coming out of E3, all I could really think was, “Man, that game is fast.”  Images of wanton violence from a first person perspective is, of course, not anything all that unique, but the frenetic quality of the action, mixed with more than just bullets flying, but bodies being whipped, kicked, exploded, and sometimes all three at once with such fluidity and rapidity seemed fresh and kind of amazing to watch.

by G. Christopher Williams

23 Feb 2011


Economies are based on need. Need leads to demand. And what can be more needful than addiction?

The historical and social context of economics simulator High Tea is pretty precisely clarified in its opening text, which describes the circumstances surrounding the game: “1830, Britain is in the grip of a mass addiction to a foreign drug. TEA!”

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