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by G. Christopher Williams

12 Jan 2016


Republique is an episodic stealth game. Originally released on iOS, it has made its way to Steam as well.

Republique is a game set in a surveillance state, the titular “Republique”, and its stealth mechanics are driven by a simple interface in which the player doesn’t so much control the main character of the game, a young girl named Hope, but instead takes control of cameras and views Hope through them. You can instruct Hope about where she should move and where she should hide by “looking ahead” of her, leap frogging from camera to camera throughout a government facility and making strategic decisions on the basis of the information gleaned from the cameras. It is the system being used against itself.

by G. Christopher Williams

6 Jan 2016


Image of a Terra Mystica board from Boardgamegeek.com

When it comes to tabletop board gaming, I currently have a crush on Jens Drögemüller’s and Helge Ostertag’s Terra Mystica. Terra Mystica is a strange creature of sorts as far as the strict definition of a Eurogaming goes. In board gaming circles European board games (as opposed to American board, also known to hardcore board gamers as Ameritrash games) are known for being light on thematic and narrative elements and heavier and more focused on the systems and mechanics that define the game’s play.

In regard to many of its systems, Terra Mystica does seem like a Eurogame. However, it has a fantasy theme (highly unusual for a Euro) and it has players take on the roles of different fantasy races, each with different abilities, strengths, and weaknesses. Such potential for lack of balance is more common to often more thematically oriented American games in which playing out a role is often more important than absolute fairness and balance.

by G. Christopher Williams

14 Dec 2015


I’m halfway through the follow up to the 2013 reboot of the Tomb Raider series, this year’s Rise of the Tomb Raider.

It’s fine.

by G. Christopher Williams

9 Dec 2015


In Western culture, it is common to view science and religion as a binary, two philosophies that supposedly are opposites. Science concerns itself with the material world, religion concerns itself with the supernatural, and never the twain shall or should meet. They shouldn’t occupy the same space in our minds, one concerns the world of facts, the other the world of beliefs, two geographic locations that are worlds apart in the West. They should never, ever appear to exist comfortably in the same room with one another, after all.

Cradle is a science fiction story that begins in a Yurt in Mongolia, not an especially common setting for a story about the future.

by G. Christopher Williams

8 Dec 2015


Drop down from the ledge above, bop a koopa on the head, and then wall jump quickly back into hiding. And here you thought that the only thing that Mario and Ezio Auditore had in common was that they were both Italian.

Plumber’s Creed was made by Pietro Ferrantelli, Neils Tiercelin, and Thomas Lean in three days for Mini Ludum Dare 63. Since the theme for this particular gamejam was “Fusion,” the rules were fairly straightforward: “Make a game that’s a fusion of two other games, game genres or game ideas.”

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Violin Virtuoso L. Subramaniam Mesmerizes in Rare New York Performance (Photos)

// Notes from the Road

"Co-presented by the World Music Institute, the 92Y hosted a rare and mesmerizing performance from India's violin virtuoso L. Subramaniam.

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