Call for Essays About Any Aspect of Popular Culture, Present or Past

 
Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Monday, Aug 30, 2010
The female body has been historically exaggerated in video games and questions arise about whether femininity is authentically represented at all in characters that very often appear to be reskinned versions of men.

This week the Moving Pixels podcast is a couple men down, but blogger Kris Ligman fills in as our guest for a discussion of femininity and the female body in video games.


The female body has been historically exaggerated in video games and questions arise about whether femininity is authentically represented at all in characters that very often appear to be reskinned versions of men. We consider why this might be, what sorts of characters might be more positive representations of women, and what messages female representations send to players of video games.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Monday, Aug 23, 2010
Our regular contributors discuss varying kinds of co-op style play from the living room to the arcade to multiplayer online and the kinds of dynamics that these experiences create among players.

Like last week, the Moving Pixels podcast crew is focusing on a broader topic in gaming for the week, co-operative gameplay. 


Our regular contributors, G. Christopher Williams, Nick Dinicola, and Thomas Cross, discuss varying kinds of co-op style play from the living room to the arcade to multiplayer online and the kinds of dynamics that these experiences create among players.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Monday, Aug 16, 2010
How initial character creation as well as ways of modifying characters, like buying clothing in a game world, affects our sense of the characters that we inhabit when we play games.

We have been focusing on discussions of individual games for a number of weeks. This week we decided to consider some broader interests in games once again. In this case, we decided to talk about how character customization effects our experience of a game world.


As a result, our discussion considers how initial character creation as well as ways of modifying characters, like buying clothing in a game world, affects our sense of the characters that we inhabit when we play games.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Monday, Aug 9, 2010
The Moving Pixels crew gets lost in the shadows and ambiguities of Limbo's haunting, little world.

Well, if you have been following the Multimedia section of the site for the past few weeks (and if you haven’t there are links below), you know that quite a few of our regular contributors have had a lot to say about Playdead’s Limbo (and we aren’t alone on the Internet).  Having had our chance to have our say individually, the Moving Pixels podcast crew decided to hash out our thinking about the game collectively.


The resulting discussion considers the significance of the game from an artistic perspective, what we feel it gets right and gets wrong, and generally gets lost in the shadows and ambiguities of the game’s haunting, little world.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Monday, Aug 2, 2010
Our regular podcast contributors take a look at the Max Payne 2: The Fall of Max Payne and consider the evolution of Remedy Entertainment's approach to world building (culminating in their most recent release, Alan Wake).

Following up on our podcast from last month on “The World of Max Payne, our regular podcast contributors take a look at the less successful but critically acclaimed sequel to the 2001 game, Max Payne 2: The Fall of Max Payne, and consider the evolution of Remedy Entertainment’s approach to world building (culminating in their most recent release, Alan Wake).


We also discuss the evolution of the character Max Payne and the gameplay mechanisms that surround him.  We also consider how a playable Mona Sax changes our sense of the series and whether Max (and the player) legitimately falls for her.


Now on PopMatters
PM Picks
Announcements

© 1999-2014 PopMatters.com. All rights reserved.
PopMatters.com™ and PopMatters™ are trademarks
of PopMatters Media, Inc.

PopMatters is wholly independently owned and operated.