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Monday, Oct 11, 2010
Some of this week's discussion may be concerned with villains that represent more abstracted forms of evil but may also confront the more "malicious" obstacles embedded in the design of a game.

The Moving Pixels Podcast crew decided to follow up on last week’s discussion of “Real Evil in Video Games” with a discussion of the various villains in games that are of a more idealized nature than the simulations of real life villainy that we had previously concerned ourselves with.


The resulting discussion took several different forms, including discussion of how gamers view conflicts within games themselves, the “evils” of various forms of antagonism within game narratives and also game mechanics themselves. 


As a result, some of this discussion may be concerned with villains that represent more abstracted forms of evil but may also confront the more “malicious” obstacles embedded in the design of a game.


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Monday, Oct 4, 2010
From the Nazis to the Mafia, we consider the potential consequences of attempting to simulate real life villainy in video games.

Hitler served as the final boss in World War II and also in Castle Wolfenstein, which is weird, right?


This week we consider a number of real life bad guys from the Nazis to the Mafia and the potential consequences of attempting to simulate such real life villainy in video games.


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Monday, Sep 27, 2010
The Moving Pixels Podcast considers the changing face of death in video games as well as what kinds of roles death serves in games.

Death happens in games.  A lot.


Well, or at least it used to.  This episode of the Moving Pixels Podcast considers the changing face of death in video games as well as what kinds of roles death serves in games. 


Is death about punishment, pleasure, pedagogy, or is it merely an immersion breaking illusion?  We play around with a number of possibilities.


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Monday, Sep 20, 2010
We discuss the virtues and vices of using games as a means to evoke emotion and whether they remain "games" in the familiar sense of the word at all.

This week’s podcast contributors, G. Christopher Williams, Nick Dinicola, and Thomas Cross, discuss some recent indie releases.  Our review includes Thomas Brush’s Coma, Alexander Ocias’s Loved, and Digipen’s Solace.


This series of games seem built more to engage and immerse than many similar titles of the Triple A variety.  We discuss the virtues and vices of using games as a means to evoke emotion and whether they remain “games” in the familiar sense of the word at all.


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Monday, Sep 13, 2010
The Moving Pixels podcast speaks to Jason Scott, director of Get Lamp, a documentary exploring the history of text-based adventure games.

Most gamers today probably don’t remember that for a while in the 1980s the best-selling, most critically acclaimed computer games didn’t have any graphics at all. They were text adventures and were some of the most innovative and challenging forms of entertainment ever conceived. Historian and documentary filmmaker Jason Scott has spent the last four years interviewing the men and women who created these games. The result is Get Lamp, a fascinating documentary about the history of these games—from the original Adventure, through the rise and fall of Infocom, and up to today’s interactive fiction scene.


Jason Scott is the curator of TextFiles.com and is also the man behind BBS: The Documentary, a look at the computer bulletin board systems that pre-date mass usage of the internet. He’s a regular speaker at hacker and technology conferences and his cat has well over a million followers on Twitter. Really.


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