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by G. Christopher Williams

28 Nov 2011


Due to some technical difficulties on my end, Jorge Albor quite graciously (and quite last minute) filled in as host for this episode.  This is probably for the best, as he probably did a better job at moderating this conversation than I ever could have.  (For those unfamiliar with Jorge, you really should check out he and Scott Juster’s weekly gaming podcast at ExperiencePoints.net—it’s well worth your time.).

So, this week features a host of new voices alongside Jorge, some of whom identify as gamers and some of whom do not, as the Moving Pixels podcast attempts to explore the concept of the so-called “girlfriend on a couch game.”  As a phrase coined by journalists to describe a particular kind of game, the “girlfriend on a couch game” seems like one in need of some discussion.  We decided, though, not to discuss “girlfriend on a couch games” but instead to see if we could find out what kind of spectators these supposed games are geared for by talking to some “girlfriends on couches” themselves.

by G. Christopher Williams

14 Nov 2011


The cutscene in games has arguably taken many forms, from the simple and minimal narrative vignettes of Ms. Pac-Man to the lushly animated FMVs that were once one of the prime selling points of the Final Fantasy series.  Many now view these experiences as intrusive moments in a game world that disrupt visual consistency or serve as storytelling short cuts that don’t do the medium justice.

This week the Moving Pixels podcast crew discuss the history of the cutscene in video games, what they may or may not have evolved into, and whether or not they still have a place in video game storytelling.

by G. Christopher Williams

7 Nov 2011


The boss fight has been a part of gaming since very near to the time of its inception.  Serving a variety of roles in offering greater challenge, suggesting the climax of a game and plot, and just simply creating a spectacle for the player, has the boss fight merely become a cliched and expected “requirement” of games?

This week we consider the history and evolution of the boss fight in gaming, as well as the possibility of alternatives to this most expected of medium conventions.

by G. Christopher Williams

31 Oct 2011


With the holiday game season upon us, the Moving Pixels blog and podcast crew have turned their atention to some of the biggest releases of the year.  The ostensible “final chapter” of the Gears of War saga is, of course, one of these most anticipated of titles.

Given Gears importance in this console generation, as one of the titles associated with the Xbox 360’s early days, the crew discusses how the trilogy has been brought to an end, its approach to multiplayer play, and speculates a bit on where this franchise may be headed in the future.

by G. Christopher Williams

24 Oct 2011


So, as my colleague in podcasting, Rick Dakan, observed, this week’s episode is a little self indulgent (but that’s okay, I guess, as I just wrote a little about the relationship between self indulgence and gaming last week).

We have been wanting to discuss a bit about how it is that “the gamer” identity is formed, so we spent some time chatting a bit about our own relationship to games and gaming and how we came to play the ways that we do.  We consider our relationship to chess, sports, board games, and RPGs and what these things might have to do with who we are.  Confessional as some of this discussion might be, there are some interesting similarities that emerge between our experience of growing up as gamers.

//Mixed media
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