Latest Blog Posts

by Nick Dinicola

6 Nov 2015


Silence of the Sleep (Jesse Makkonen, 2014)

Puzzles and horror make a curious pair. This pairing has a real history in video games. When one thinks of “old school survival-horror,” one often thinks of an environment with lots of locked doors, hidden keys, and esoteric riddles. But why was it so often this way? Was this a mutually beneficial relationship, one in which the stress of the horror made the puzzles more exciting and in which the methodology of the puzzles forced us to stay rational amidst the horror? Or were the convoluted puzzles included simply to pad out the game to a more marketable length?

by Nick Dinicola

30 Oct 2015


Horror is hard. You can never really be scared by the same thing twice, not in the same way. After that first time, you’re prepared for it. That preparation may be conscious—a knowledge of clichés and tropes that help you predict the future—or it may be unconscious—a subtle feeling of familiarity that turns something once terrifying into something merely scary—but either way the knowledge of a scare subtracts from its effectiveness. Combine that fact with the sheer number of horror related movies, games, books, and whatnot released in any given year… and horror becomes very hard.

But horror is a cakewalk compared to its little brother: The less scary, more abstract, tonally trickier sub-genre of the spooky story.

by Nick Dinicola

23 Oct 2015


The Music Machine, by one-man-developer David Szymanski, does not go where you think it’s going. It sets up an interesting premise, then veers off in a completely unexpected direction. Usually that’s a bad thing, but in this case, it’s a very good thing. It goes from interesting to fascinating, and establishes a world that I desperately want to dig into more deeply.

by Nick Dinicola

19 Oct 2015


The generally agreed upon distinction between horror and terror is that terror comes first. Terror is that uncomfortable feeling of anticipation when you know something bad is about to happen. Horror is the shock and disgust that comes from encountering the bad thing.

Stasis certainly looks like a point-and-click horror game, especially with its judicious use of gore and other horrifying imagery, but these images aren’t just there to shock us. They’re also there to terrorize us, to build that dreaded anticipation of something bad being just around the corner. The greatest trick that Stasis pulls on the player is making us think we’re in danger. We’re constantly waiting for the proverbial “monsters” to appear, the ones that have destroyed this science lab, that seem to stalk us through the corridors, but it keeps putting off this encounter to show us their handiwork instead. As a result, all those scenes of horror become representative of something even worse, something terrifying.

by Nick Dinicola

16 Oct 2015


Shutter, made by developer Cosmic Logic, is a horror game for our modern surveillance age. You play a tech support guy who is using a drone to investigate reports of vandalism at an isolated cabin. It’s no spoiler to say that you find more in the house than just graffiti.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Supernatural: Season 11, Episode 12 - "Don't You Forget About Me"

// Channel Surfing

"In another stand-alone episode, there's a lot of teen drama and some surprises, but not much potential.

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