Latest Blog Posts

by Nick Dinicola

26 Jul 2013


Aliens: Colonial Marines is a bad game, but it should still be played by people who love this medium because it’s bad in some interesting and uniquely ludic ways. A few weeks ago, I wrote about how the death scenes in Tomb Raider might have felt more gratuitous than they actually were because of the gameplay around them, and the same concept applies to everything in Colonial Marines/ It’s a fantastically flawed game in which every poorly implemented system helps bring down every other poorly implemented system.

by Nick Dinicola

19 Jul 2013


The most common criticism of the Uncharted games is the dichotomy between the tone of combat and the tone of the cut scenes. In combat, Drake is a killing machine, able to wipe out hundreds of lives with a smirk and smile, and the cut scenes never acknowledge this penchant for mass violence. Such a dichotomy was dubbed “ludonarrative dissonance” in a blog post by Clint Hocking.

On one hand, we can argue that Drake was fighting in self defense since the bad guys usually do shoot first, but on other hand, he does kill so many people. Either way, the criticism went unanswered by Naughty Dog, as each Uncharted fell into the tonal trap. However, The Last of Us feels like a direct response to that criticism because unlike Drake, Joel represents the perfect synthesis of gameplay and character.

by Nick Dinicola

12 Jul 2013


A good menu can set the tone for the rest of the game to come. I’ve written three times before about clever menus, and since then Fez and Tomb Raider have earned another special mention—especially Tomb Raider, which has a great title screen and a great main menu.

by Nick Dinicola

28 Jun 2013


Tomb Raider has been criticized for being exploitative in its depiction of violence towards Lara. It’s a valid criticism, but whenever it’s made, there are two death scenes in particular that are always used as examples: The scene when Lara is impaled through the chest by a tree branch while parachuting and the one when she is impaled through the neck by a metal spike while being carried along on a river. There are other horrible ways to die, but those are rarely discussed: She’s also crushed by a boulder, mauled by wolves, shot through the neck with an arrow, or perhaps the worst one, she falls into the ocean and hits her head on a rock and drowns while unconscious. With all the horrible ways to die, why are the impalings singled out as gratuitous or exploitative? I think that it has less to do with their content and more to do with their context.

by Nick Dinicola

21 Jun 2013


A couple weeks ago I wrote about how breakable weapons in Silent Hill: Downpour allowed players to feel vulnerable without making them weak, but the game evokes horror in other ways as well. In particular, through its smart level design (“The Combative Horror of Silent Hill: Downpour, PopMatters, 7 June 2013).

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Tibet House's 30th Anniversary Benefit Concert Celebrated Philip Glass' 80th

// Notes from the Road

"Philip Glass, the artistic director of the Tibet House benefits, celebrated his 80th birthday at this year's annual benefit with performances from Patti Smith, Iggy Pop, Brittany Howard, Sufjan Stevens and more.

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